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Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2016-12-29
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The influence of varying dietary sodium content on circadian blood pressure profile in patients with salt-sensitive hypertension

Marta Sołtysiak, Krystyna Widecka, Tomasz Miazgowski, Anna Brzeska, Joanna Ziemak
DOI: 10.5603/AH.2016.0024
·
Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):211-215.

open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2016-12-29

Abstract

The pathogenesis of essential hypertension is not fully understood. Literature indicates the complexity of blood pressure regulating mechanisms with a high impact of genetics and environmental factors. Previous experimental studies have shown the importance of salt intake in the development of hypertension. The aim of the study was to explore the influence of varying dietary sodium content on circadian blood pressure profile in patients with salt-sensitive hypertension. The study was carried out among 69 salt-sensitive hypertensive patients (19 females i 50 males) mean aged 36.1 ± 8.0 years. Study protocol provided low sodium diet firstly then high sodium diet containing 10–20 mmol and 220–240 mmol of sodium per day respectively. On each of the diet ABPM was performed. Our results suggest that in salt-sensitive patients the reduction of salt intake may decrease blood pressure and restore its circadian profile and thus lead to the reduction in the rate of complications of hypertension.

Abstract

The pathogenesis of essential hypertension is not fully understood. Literature indicates the complexity of blood pressure regulating mechanisms with a high impact of genetics and environmental factors. Previous experimental studies have shown the importance of salt intake in the development of hypertension. The aim of the study was to explore the influence of varying dietary sodium content on circadian blood pressure profile in patients with salt-sensitive hypertension. The study was carried out among 69 salt-sensitive hypertensive patients (19 females i 50 males) mean aged 36.1 ± 8.0 years. Study protocol provided low sodium diet firstly then high sodium diet containing 10–20 mmol and 220–240 mmol of sodium per day respectively. On each of the diet ABPM was performed. Our results suggest that in salt-sensitive patients the reduction of salt intake may decrease blood pressure and restore its circadian profile and thus lead to the reduction in the rate of complications of hypertension.

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Keywords

arterial hypertension, sodium sensitivity, blood pressure profile, sodium intake

About this article
Title

The influence of varying dietary sodium content on circadian blood pressure profile in patients with salt-sensitive hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)

Pages

211-215

Published online

2016-12-29

DOI

10.5603/AH.2016.0024

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):211-215.

Keywords

arterial hypertension
sodium sensitivity
blood pressure profile
sodium intake

Authors

Marta Sołtysiak
Krystyna Widecka
Tomasz Miazgowski
Anna Brzeska
Joanna Ziemak

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