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Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2016-12-29
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Testosterone assocition with blood pressure profile and left ventricular mass in a young hypertensive population

Marta Sołtysiak, Jacek Głowala, Joanna Ziemak, Paweł Sołtysiak, Tomasz Miazgowski, Krystyna Widecka
DOI: 10.5603/AH.2016.0022
·
Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):200-205.

open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2016-12-29

Abstract

Sex hormones not only regulate the gonads function, but also may affect the cardiovascular system, although their role is still not clear. Testosterone influence on arterial pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy were widely reported. A number of factors have been implicated as the underlying cause of the relation between testosterone and blood pressure, including sex and age as most important ones. In present findings, a 24-hour ABPM revealed that 33.9% of patients had an altered pattern of blood pressure with no significant differences between sexes. In the whole studied sample, positive correlation has been found between testosterone and 24-hour systolic blood pressure, daytime BP, sodium and potassium levels in the 24-hour urine collection, and left ventricular mass index. In conclusion, testosterone association with blood pressure profile and left ventricular mass in a young hypertensive population seems to be probable, but further analysis is necessary.

Abstract

Sex hormones not only regulate the gonads function, but also may affect the cardiovascular system, although their role is still not clear. Testosterone influence on arterial pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy were widely reported. A number of factors have been implicated as the underlying cause of the relation between testosterone and blood pressure, including sex and age as most important ones. In present findings, a 24-hour ABPM revealed that 33.9% of patients had an altered pattern of blood pressure with no significant differences between sexes. In the whole studied sample, positive correlation has been found between testosterone and 24-hour systolic blood pressure, daytime BP, sodium and potassium levels in the 24-hour urine collection, and left ventricular mass index. In conclusion, testosterone association with blood pressure profile and left ventricular mass in a young hypertensive population seems to be probable, but further analysis is necessary.

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Keywords

testosterone, blood pressure

About this article
Title

Testosterone assocition with blood pressure profile and left ventricular mass in a young hypertensive population

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)

Pages

200-205

Published online

2016-12-29

DOI

10.5603/AH.2016.0022

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):200-205.

Keywords

testosterone
blood pressure

Authors

Marta Sołtysiak
Jacek Głowala
Joanna Ziemak
Paweł Sołtysiak
Tomasz Miazgowski
Krystyna Widecka

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