open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
Editorial
Published online: 2016-12-29
Get Citation

Hypertension and depression — the terrible two

Päivi Korhonen
DOI: 10.5603/AH.2016.0021
·
Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):198-199.

open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
Editorial
Published online: 2016-12-29

Abstract

Depression is one of the most common mental health disorders globally, presenting an increasing burden everywhere — as are hypertension-related diseases. Depression nearly doubles the risk for developing coronary heart disease, and in those already suffering from heart disease, depression nearly doubles the risk of mortality. This elevated cardiac risk associated with depression is independent of classical risk factors, and similar in degree to smoking and hypercholesterolaemia.

Abstract

Depression is one of the most common mental health disorders globally, presenting an increasing burden everywhere — as are hypertension-related diseases. Depression nearly doubles the risk for developing coronary heart disease, and in those already suffering from heart disease, depression nearly doubles the risk of mortality. This elevated cardiac risk associated with depression is independent of classical risk factors, and similar in degree to smoking and hypercholesterolaemia.

Get Citation

Keywords

hypertension, depression

About this article
Title

Hypertension and depression — the terrible two

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)

Pages

198-199

Published online

2016-12-29

DOI

10.5603/AH.2016.0021

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):198-199.

Keywords

hypertension
depression

Authors

Päivi Korhonen

References (11)
  1. Katon WJ, Lin EHB, Von Korff M, et al. Cardiac risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus and major depression. J Gen Intern Med. 2004; 19(12): 1192–1199.
  2. Nicholson A, Kuper H, Hemingway H. Depression as an aetiologic and prognostic factor in coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of 6362 events among 146 538 participants in 54 observational studies. Eur Heart J. 2006; 27(23): 2763–2774.
  3. Esler M, Turbott J, Schwarz R, et al. The peripheral kinetics of norepinephrine in depressive illness. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1982; 39(3): 295–300.
  4. Veith RC, Lewis N, Linares OA, et al. Sympathetic nervous system activity in major depression. Basal and desipramine-induced alterations in plasma norepinephrine kinetics. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994; 51(5): 411–422.
  5. Reynolds CF, Frank E, Siu AL, et al. US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for depression in adults: U.S. preventive services task force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2009; 151(11): 784–792.
  6. Kotseva K, Wood D, De Backer G, et al. EUROASPIRE Study Group. EUROASPIRE III: a survey on the lifestyle, risk factors and use of cardioprotective drug therapies in coronary patients from 22 European countries. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2009; 16(2): 121–137.
  7. Cassano P, Fava M. Depression and public health: an overview. J Psychosom Res. 2002; 53(4): 849–857.
  8. Li Z, Li Y, Chen L, et al. Prevalence of Depression in Patients With Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Medicine (Baltimore). 2015; 94(31): e1317.
  9. Stapelberg NJC, Neumann DL, Shum DHK, et al. A topographical map of the causal network of mechanisms underlying the relationship between major depressive disorder and coronary heart disease. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2011; 45(5): 351–369.
  10. Gehi A, Haas D, Pipkin S, et al. Depression and medication adherence in outpatients with coronary heart disease: findings from the Heart and Soul Study. Arch Intern Med. 2005; 165(21): 2508–2513.
  11. Cooney GM, Dwan K, Greig CA, et al. Exercise for depression. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013(9): CD004366.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl