open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
REVIEW
Published online: 2016-12-29
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Foetal programming in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension

Damian Gojowy, Marcin Adamczak, Andrzej Więcek
DOI: 10.5603/AH.2016.0026
·
Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):228-232.

open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
REVIEW
Published online: 2016-12-29

Abstract

Pathogenesis of arterial hypertension is complex and in spite of the decades of studies is not yet entirely understood. In recent years, attention has been paid to the phenomenon of foetal programming and its relationship to arterial hypertension in adult life. It has been shown that low birth weight predisposes to the development of arterial hypertension. The relationship between the number of nephrons and blood pressure and the risk of hypertension also has been found. Blood pressure and the number of nephrons depend on both genetic and environmental factors affecting pregnant females. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of foetal programming in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension in adults.

Abstract

Pathogenesis of arterial hypertension is complex and in spite of the decades of studies is not yet entirely understood. In recent years, attention has been paid to the phenomenon of foetal programming and its relationship to arterial hypertension in adult life. It has been shown that low birth weight predisposes to the development of arterial hypertension. The relationship between the number of nephrons and blood pressure and the risk of hypertension also has been found. Blood pressure and the number of nephrons depend on both genetic and environmental factors affecting pregnant females. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of foetal programming in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension in adults.

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Keywords

arterial hypertension; foetal programming; foetal development

About this article
Title

Foetal programming in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)

Pages

228-232

Published online

2016-12-29

DOI

10.5603/AH.2016.0026

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):228-232.

Keywords

arterial hypertension
foetal programming
foetal development

Authors

Damian Gojowy
Marcin Adamczak
Andrzej Więcek

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