open access

Vol 20, No 1 (2016)
STATE-OF-THE ART REVIEW
Published online: 2016-03-31
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Microbiota patterns and risk of cardiometabolic disease — opportunities for intervention?

Peter Nilsson
DOI: 10.5603/AH.2016.0001
·
Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(1):1-4.

open access

Vol 20, No 1 (2016)
STATE-OF-THE ART REVIEW
Published online: 2016-03-31

Abstract

In every human being, there is a substantial proportion (1–2 kg) of total body weight constituted by the gut microbiota content in the gastro-intestinal system. Recent research findings, based on mapping of the microbiome, have stated that in healthy subjects, the gut microbiota richness and diversity is higher as compared to obese subjects or patients suffering from cardiometabolic disease, or even long-standing hypertension when a different and less rich pattern is seen (dysbiosis). Intervention with certain food constituents, e.g. Mediterranean diet or dairy products such as lactobacillae-containing yoghurt, holds promise that this could be of benefit for improved organ function, improved metabolism and lowering disease risk. Randomized, controlled intervention studies are needed to test the hypothesis that a reduction in dysbiosis induced by external dietary interventions could translate into health benefits.

Abstract

In every human being, there is a substantial proportion (1–2 kg) of total body weight constituted by the gut microbiota content in the gastro-intestinal system. Recent research findings, based on mapping of the microbiome, have stated that in healthy subjects, the gut microbiota richness and diversity is higher as compared to obese subjects or patients suffering from cardiometabolic disease, or even long-standing hypertension when a different and less rich pattern is seen (dysbiosis). Intervention with certain food constituents, e.g. Mediterranean diet or dairy products such as lactobacillae-containing yoghurt, holds promise that this could be of benefit for improved organ function, improved metabolism and lowering disease risk. Randomized, controlled intervention studies are needed to test the hypothesis that a reduction in dysbiosis induced by external dietary interventions could translate into health benefits.

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Keywords

microbiota; cardiometabolic disease

About this article
Title

Microbiota patterns and risk of cardiometabolic disease — opportunities for intervention?

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 20, No 1 (2016)

Pages

1-4

Published online

2016-03-31

DOI

10.5603/AH.2016.0001

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(1):1-4.

Keywords

microbiota
cardiometabolic disease

Authors

Peter Nilsson

References (22)
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