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Original research article
Published online: 2021-05-10
Submitted: 2021-02-22
Accepted: 2021-03-30
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Comparison of various diagnostic methods in assessing platelet count in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

Michal Witkowski, Magdalena Witkowska, Marzena Tybura-Sawicka, Agata Majchrzak, Tadeusz Robak, Piotr Smolewski
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.a2021.0030

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Published online: 2021-05-10
Submitted: 2021-02-22
Accepted: 2021-03-30

Abstract

Introduction: Accurate platelet count (PLTC) in immune thrombocytopenia is important in order to make therapeutic decisions. The basic method of assessing PLTC is peripheral blood morphology with EDTA or with citrate. The older way of assessing PLTC is measurement under the microscope (FONIO), and the newer way is the fluorescent method. The purpose of this study was to compare PLTC methods, and find the most reliable.

Material and methods: PLTC was assessed using five methods in adult patients with previously untreated ITP (EDTA, citrate, FONIO, fluorescent, and immunofluorescent methods).

Results: 66 patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 56 and 56% were men. Median PLTC in EDTA was 69 G/L, in citrate 69 G/L, in fluorescence 69 G/L, in FONIO 90 G/L, and in immunofluorescence 83 G/L. A significant difference in PLTC was observed in comparing EDTA to immunofluorescence (53% ±123%), followed by FONIO (51% ±91%). PLTC from immunofluorescence differed from the fluorescent method by 40% ±78%.

Conclusions: The most valuable method for obtaining PLTC is the immunofluorescent method. These findings are especially important in helping to make therapeutic decisions during a challenging time for accessing medical care like a pandemic.

Abstract

Introduction: Accurate platelet count (PLTC) in immune thrombocytopenia is important in order to make therapeutic decisions. The basic method of assessing PLTC is peripheral blood morphology with EDTA or with citrate. The older way of assessing PLTC is measurement under the microscope (FONIO), and the newer way is the fluorescent method. The purpose of this study was to compare PLTC methods, and find the most reliable.

Material and methods: PLTC was assessed using five methods in adult patients with previously untreated ITP (EDTA, citrate, FONIO, fluorescent, and immunofluorescent methods).

Results: 66 patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 56 and 56% were men. Median PLTC in EDTA was 69 G/L, in citrate 69 G/L, in fluorescence 69 G/L, in FONIO 90 G/L, and in immunofluorescence 83 G/L. A significant difference in PLTC was observed in comparing EDTA to immunofluorescence (53% ±123%), followed by FONIO (51% ±91%). PLTC from immunofluorescence differed from the fluorescent method by 40% ±78%.

Conclusions: The most valuable method for obtaining PLTC is the immunofluorescent method. These findings are especially important in helping to make therapeutic decisions during a challenging time for accessing medical care like a pandemic.

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Keywords

flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, immune thrombocytopenia, platelet count

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About this article
Title

Comparison of various diagnostic methods in assessing platelet count in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original research article

Published online

2021-05-10

DOI

10.5603/AHP.a2021.0030

Keywords

flow cytometry
immunofluorescence
immune thrombocytopenia
platelet count

Authors

Michal Witkowski
Magdalena Witkowska
Marzena Tybura-Sawicka
Agata Majchrzak
Tadeusz Robak
Piotr Smolewski

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