open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2021)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-01-22
Submitted: 2021-01-12
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A radiobiological comparison of hypo-fractionation versus conventional fractionation for breast cancer 3D-conformal radiation therapy

Arezoo Kazemzadeh, Iraj Abedi, Alireza Amouheidari, Atefeh Shirvany
DOI: 10.5603/RPOR.a2021.0015
·
Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2021;26(1):86-92.

open access

Vol 26, No 1 (2021)
Original research articles
Published online: 2021-01-22
Submitted: 2021-01-12

Abstract

Background: The present research was aimed to compare the toxicity and effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiotherapy versus hypo-fractionated radiotherapy in breast cancer utilizing a radiobiological model.

Materials and methods: Thirty-five left-sided breast cancer patients without involvement of the supraclavicular and axillary lymph nodes (with the nodal stage of N0) that had been treated with conventional or hypo-fractionated were incorporated in this study. A radiobiological model was performed to foretell normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumor control probability (TCP).

Results: The data represented that TCP values for conventional and hypo-fractionated regimens were 99.16 ± 0.09 and 95.96 ± 0.48, respectively (p = 0.00). Moreover, the NTCP values of the lung for conventional and hypo-fractionated treatment were 0.024 versus 0.13 (p = 0.035), respectively. Also, NTCP values of the heart were equal to zero for both regimens.

Conclusion: In summary, hypo-fractionated regimens had comparable efficacy to conventional fraction radiation therapy in the case of dosimetry parameters for patients who had left breast cancer. But, utilizing the radiobiological model, conventional fractionated regimens presented better results compared to hypo-fractionated regimens.

 

Abstract

Background: The present research was aimed to compare the toxicity and effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiotherapy versus hypo-fractionated radiotherapy in breast cancer utilizing a radiobiological model.

Materials and methods: Thirty-five left-sided breast cancer patients without involvement of the supraclavicular and axillary lymph nodes (with the nodal stage of N0) that had been treated with conventional or hypo-fractionated were incorporated in this study. A radiobiological model was performed to foretell normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumor control probability (TCP).

Results: The data represented that TCP values for conventional and hypo-fractionated regimens were 99.16 ± 0.09 and 95.96 ± 0.48, respectively (p = 0.00). Moreover, the NTCP values of the lung for conventional and hypo-fractionated treatment were 0.024 versus 0.13 (p = 0.035), respectively. Also, NTCP values of the heart were equal to zero for both regimens.

Conclusion: In summary, hypo-fractionated regimens had comparable efficacy to conventional fraction radiation therapy in the case of dosimetry parameters for patients who had left breast cancer. But, utilizing the radiobiological model, conventional fractionated regimens presented better results compared to hypo-fractionated regimens.

 

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Keywords

radiobiological model; hypo-fractionation; conventional fractionation; breast cancer; 3D-conformal radiation therapy

About this article
Title

A radiobiological comparison of hypo-fractionation versus conventional fractionation for breast cancer 3D-conformal radiation therapy

Journal

Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

Issue

Vol 26, No 1 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

86-92

Published online

2021-01-22

DOI

10.5603/RPOR.a2021.0015

Bibliographic record

Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2021;26(1):86-92.

Keywords

radiobiological model
hypo-fractionation
conventional fractionation
breast cancer
3D-conformal radiation therapy

Authors

Arezoo Kazemzadeh
Iraj Abedi
Alireza Amouheidari
Atefeh Shirvany

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