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Published online: 2021-09-08
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Epidemiology of anxiety and depressive disorders

Bogumiła Lubecka1, Marek Lubecki1, Robert Pudlo1
DOI: 10.5603/PSYCH.a2021.0034
Affiliations
  1. Śląski Uniwersytet Medyczny

open access

Ahead of print
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Published online: 2021-09-08

Abstract

The article presents data on the prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression in adults. Conducting epidemiological studies on the prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression in general population provides an opportunity to better understand their etiology, assess incidence trends, identify risk modifying factors, plan preventive measures and treatment strategies. The prevalence of depressive disorders ranges from 2.6% to 5.9% depending on gender and the world region, the number of people with depression increased by 18.4% between 2005 and 2015. In the group of adult Poles, 3% of respondents have experienced at least one episode of depression till now. In international studies, the prevalence of anxiety disorders is approximately 24.9%. Specific phobia is the most common anxiety disorder in life, and obsessive-compulsive disorder is the least common. In a study of the Polish population, the prevalence of anxiety disorders ranged from 0.4% to 4.3%.

Abstract

The article presents data on the prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression in adults. Conducting epidemiological studies on the prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression in general population provides an opportunity to better understand their etiology, assess incidence trends, identify risk modifying factors, plan preventive measures and treatment strategies. The prevalence of depressive disorders ranges from 2.6% to 5.9% depending on gender and the world region, the number of people with depression increased by 18.4% between 2005 and 2015. In the group of adult Poles, 3% of respondents have experienced at least one episode of depression till now. In international studies, the prevalence of anxiety disorders is approximately 24.9%. Specific phobia is the most common anxiety disorder in life, and obsessive-compulsive disorder is the least common. In a study of the Polish population, the prevalence of anxiety disorders ranged from 0.4% to 4.3%.

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Keywords

depression, anxiety disorders, epidemiology

About this article
Title

Epidemiology of anxiety and depressive disorders

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Review paper

Published online

2021-09-08

DOI

10.5603/PSYCH.a2021.0034

Keywords

depression
anxiety disorders
epidemiology

Authors

Bogumiła Lubecka
Marek Lubecki
Robert Pudlo

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