Vol 18, No 1 (2021)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-10-13
Get Citation

Mental health impact of quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic

Marlena Sokół-Szawłowska
DOI: 10.5603/PSYCH.a2020.0046
·
Psychiatria 2021;18(1):57-62.

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Vol 18, No 1 (2021)
Prace poglądowe - nadesłane
Published online: 2020-10-13

Abstract

Coming in 2019 and the very rapid dissemination of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, led to the
announcement of unprecedented recommendations by the WHO. Their goal was to limit and slow the spread of this
potentially deadly infection in the population. The basic recommendations were disinfection, use of personal protective
equipment with social distancing. National governments decided on collective quarantines for fear of overloading health
care systems in the first months of 2020. There have been shorter or longer periods of extinction of economy in order
to limit interpersonal contacts. This strategy proved effective, but its economic costs were very high. Non-material costs,
related to mental health are more difficult to quantify and describe. The article is an attempt to analyze the knowledge
about influence of social isolation during quarantine on mental state based on research conducted before and during
the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The stress associated with being in quarantine mainly affects the occurrence of anxiety and
depression. Their intensity depends on belonging to particularly sensitive groups. Further in-depth and methodologically
correct long-term studies on large populations are necessary. The results of such studies can guide clinicians and public
health managers.

Abstract

Coming in 2019 and the very rapid dissemination of SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, led to the
announcement of unprecedented recommendations by the WHO. Their goal was to limit and slow the spread of this
potentially deadly infection in the population. The basic recommendations were disinfection, use of personal protective
equipment with social distancing. National governments decided on collective quarantines for fear of overloading health
care systems in the first months of 2020. There have been shorter or longer periods of extinction of economy in order
to limit interpersonal contacts. This strategy proved effective, but its economic costs were very high. Non-material costs,
related to mental health are more difficult to quantify and describe. The article is an attempt to analyze the knowledge
about influence of social isolation during quarantine on mental state based on research conducted before and during
the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. The stress associated with being in quarantine mainly affects the occurrence of anxiety and
depression. Their intensity depends on belonging to particularly sensitive groups. Further in-depth and methodologically
correct long-term studies on large populations are necessary. The results of such studies can guide clinicians and public
health managers.

Get Citation

Keywords

COVID-19, quarantine, mental health

About this article
Title

Mental health impact of quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 18, No 1 (2021)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

57-62

Published online

2020-10-13

DOI

10.5603/PSYCH.a2020.0046

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2021;18(1):57-62.

Keywords

COVID-19
quarantine
mental health

Authors

Marlena Sokół-Szawłowska

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