open access

Vol 17, No 3 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-07-13
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Comparison of behavioral problems between the children with one schizophrenic parent and children with healthy parents

Narges Sadeghi, Fatemeh Etedali, Mahboubeh Firouzkouhi Moghadam, Alireza Shamsi
DOI: 10.5603/PSYCH.2020.0023
·
Psychiatria 2020;17(3):109-114.

open access

Vol 17, No 3 (2020)
Prace oryginalne - nadesłane
Published online: 2020-07-13

Abstract

Introduction: The quality of relationship between children and parents in the early years of life is one of the most effective factors in the mental growth of the children. A parent being affected by schizophrenia may have very deep effects on the mental growth of the children. This study aimed to compare the behavioral problems in the children with one schizophrenic parent and children with healthy parents.

Material and methods: This descriptive study was performed in Zahedan, Iran in 2014-2015. The behavioral problems of 60 children with a schizophrenic parent were compared to that of 60 children with healthy parents. The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was used to evaluate the two groups.

Results: The comparison of the CBCL score between two groups showed a significant difference (P < 0.005). Moreover, the CBCL score of primary school girls (P = 0.03) and boys (P = 0.04) was significantly different between the two groups. No significant difference was reported between the two groups regarding the CBCL score of teenage girls (P = 0.09) and teenage boys (P = 0.09).

Conclusions: Our findings can be regarded as evidence supporting the effect of psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia in parents on the behavioral problems of children.

Abstract

Introduction: The quality of relationship between children and parents in the early years of life is one of the most effective factors in the mental growth of the children. A parent being affected by schizophrenia may have very deep effects on the mental growth of the children. This study aimed to compare the behavioral problems in the children with one schizophrenic parent and children with healthy parents.

Material and methods: This descriptive study was performed in Zahedan, Iran in 2014-2015. The behavioral problems of 60 children with a schizophrenic parent were compared to that of 60 children with healthy parents. The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was used to evaluate the two groups.

Results: The comparison of the CBCL score between two groups showed a significant difference (P < 0.005). Moreover, the CBCL score of primary school girls (P = 0.03) and boys (P = 0.04) was significantly different between the two groups. No significant difference was reported between the two groups regarding the CBCL score of teenage girls (P = 0.09) and teenage boys (P = 0.09).

Conclusions: Our findings can be regarded as evidence supporting the effect of psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia in parents on the behavioral problems of children.

Get Citation

Keywords

children, behavioral problems, parents, schizophrenia

About this article
Title

Comparison of behavioral problems between the children with one schizophrenic parent and children with healthy parents

Journal

Psychiatria (Psychiatry)

Issue

Vol 17, No 3 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

109-114

Published online

2020-07-13

DOI

10.5603/PSYCH.2020.0023

Bibliographic record

Psychiatria 2020;17(3):109-114.

Keywords

children
behavioral problems
parents
schizophrenia

Authors

Narges Sadeghi
Fatemeh Etedali
Mahboubeh Firouzkouhi Moghadam
Alireza Shamsi

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