Vol 5 (2020): Continuous Publishing
Original paper
Published online: 2020-11-25

open access

Page views 440
Article views/downloads 472
Get Citation

Connect on Social Media

Connect on Social Media

Knowledge and practice on solar ultraviolet radiation and its impact on vision: a case study among Kenyan optometrists

Shadrack Muma1
Ophthalmol J 2020;5:136-142.

Abstract

Background: The purpose of the study was to investigate optometrist’s knowledge and practice on solar ultraviolet
radiation and its implication on vision.

Material and method: A survey was conducted using purposive sampling. The study was conducted from January 2020 to February 2020 using emailed questionnaires. Basic socio-demographic characteristics, participants’ knowledge and practice on solar ultraviolet radiation were assessed. The key variables under consideration were knowledge and practice on solar ultraviolet radiation. Odds ratios were calculated and chi-square test conducted.

Results: A total of 270 optometrists received the survey with a response rate of 81% and mean age of 26.4 ± 4.3 years. Only 36% had good knowledge of the effects produced by solar radiation. On attenuation knowledge only 1% recommended contrast filters, 13% polarizing lenses and 4% polycarbonate. There solar ultraviolet radiation and cortical cataract (p = 0.012) was significantly different. Men had good knowledge about cataract (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), keratopathy (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.35–1.56), and pterygium (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.32–1.43). Most respondents 66% could only dispense Photochromatic lenses because they are readily available.

Conclusion: The study denotes that solar ultraviolet radiation is an issue of global public health concern. Awareness is still a challenge and optometrists are well placed to create awareness. Public health act should initiate a policy on the attenuation of solar ultraviolet radiation.

Article available in PDF format

View PDF Download PDF file

References

  1. Bishop KD, Olszewski AJ. Epidemiology and survival outcomes of ocular and mucosal melanomas: a population-based analysis. Int J Cancer. 2014; 134(12): 2961–2971.
  2. Brandberg Y, Sjödén PO, Rosdahl I. Assessment of sun-related behaviour in individuals with dysplastic naevus syndrome: a comparison between diary recordings and questionnaire responses. Melanoma Res. 1997; 7(4): 347–351.
  3. Moise AF, Gies HP, Harrison SL. Estimation of the annual solar UVR exposure dose of infants and small children in tropical Queensland, Australia. Photochem Photobiol. 1999; 69(4): 457–463.
  4. Rosmini F, Stazi MA, Milton RC, et al. Italian–American Cataract Study. Group A dose-response effect between a sunlight index and age-related cataracts. Ann Epidemiol. 1994; 4(4): 266–270.
  5. Luande J, Henschke CI, Mohammed N. The Tanzanian human albino skin. Natural history. Cancer. 1985; 55(8): 1823–1828, doi: 10.1002/1097-0142(19850415)55:8<1823::aid-cncr2820550830>3.0.co;2-x.
  6. Raasch BA, Buettner PG. Multiple non-melanoma skin cancer in an exposed Australian population. Int J Dermatol. 2002; 41(10): 652–658.
  7. Parisi AV, Kimlin MG. Comparison of the spectral biologically effective solar ultraviolet in adjacent tree shade and sun. Phys Med Biol. 1999; 44(8): 2071–2080.
  8. Hersey P, Bradley M, Hasic E, et al. Immunological effects of solarium exposure. Lancet. 1983; 1(8324): 545–548.
  9. McCarty CA. Epidemiology of pterygium in Victoria, Australia. Br J Ophthalmol. 2000; 84(3): 289–292.
  10. Norn M. Spheroid degeneration, keratopathy, pinguecula, and pterygium in Japan (Kyoto). Acta Ophthalmol. 1984; 62(1): 54–60.
  11. Nwosu SN. Ocular problems of young adults in rural Nigeria. International Ophthalmology. 1998; 22(5): 259–263.
  12. Panchapakesan J, Hourihan J, Mitchell P. Prevalence of pterygium and pinguecula: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Aust N Z J Ophthalmol. 1998; 26(Suppl 1): S2–S5.
  13. Rasanayagam RT. The incidence and racial distribution of pterygium in West Malaysia. Trans Ophthalmol Soc NZ. 1973; 25: 56–59.
  14. Sasaki H, Asano K, Kojima M, et al. [Epidemiological Survey of Ocular Diseases in K Island, Amami Islands Prevalence of Cataract and Pterygium]. Nippon Ganka Gakkai Zasshi. 1999; 103(7): 556–563.
  15. Sebban A, Hirst LW. Pterygium recurrence rate at the Princess Alexandra Hospital. Aust NZJ Ophthalmol. 1991; 19(3): 203–206.
  16. Singh MM, Murthy GV, Venkatraman R. A study of ocular morbidity among elderly population in a rural area of central India. Indian J Ophthalmol. 1997; 45(1): 61–65.
  17. Duncan DD, Muñoz B, Bandeen-Roche K, et al. Assessment of ocular exposure to ultraviolet-B for population studies. Salisbury Eye Evaluation Project Team. Photochem Photobiol. 1997; 66(5): 701–709.
  18. Garssen J, Nowal M, Loveren HV. UV-B induced immunomodulation: a health risk. Polar Research. 2017; 18(2): 339–343.
  19. Moise AF, Gies HP, Harrison SL. Estimation of the Annual Solar UVR Exposure Dose of Infants and Small Children in Tropical Queensland, Australia. Photochem Photobiol. 1999; 69(4): 457–463.
  20. Parisi AV, Kimlin MG. Comparison of the spectral biologically effective solar ultraviolet in adjacent tree shade and sun. Phys Med Biol. 1999; 44(8): 2071–2080.