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Research paper
Published online: 2022-04-26
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Supportive activities in oncological wards during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative study

Mahdieh Poodineh Moghadam1, Ahmad Nasiri2, Gholamhossein Mahmoudirad2
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2022.0017
Affiliations
  1. Student Research Committee, Birjand University of Medical Sciences, Birjand, Iran
  2. Departments of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Birjand University of Medical Sciences, Birjand, Iran

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2022-04-26

Abstract

Introduction. The oncology ward is a challenging and unique workplace due to physical and psychological stress that staff experience and the need for their support. Cancer patients and oncology nurses have many needs, and support is one of the basic ones. This study aimed to explore supportive activities in the oncology ward during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Material and methods. This qualitative study was conducted in Eastern and Southeastern Iran in 2020 and 2021 through a conventional content analysis approach. The participants included 21 (10 oncology nurses, 5 managers, and 6 cancer patients), who were selected through purposive sampling. To collect data, in-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews were done. Interviews were continued until data saturation was achieved. After transcribing the interviews, the data were analyzed according to the steps proposed by Graneheim & Lundman. 

Results. The results consisted of three main themes and nine categories, namely the perceive of threat in supportive atmosphere in the oncology ward (cancer patients’ sense of desperation and need for support, difficulty of working in the department, close relationships governing the ward), Seeking support in the oncology ward (Professional support, patient advocacy), and supportive divergence (poor family support, perceived poor social support, unsupportive behaviors, Being far from the supportive standards of working in an oncology ward). 

Conclusions. The results of the study have shown that the supportive activities in the oncology ward during the COVID-19 pandemic are affected by various factors. The experiences of participants provide new insight into supportive activities around managing oncology wards supportive needs during such stressful times.

Abstract

Introduction. The oncology ward is a challenging and unique workplace due to physical and psychological stress that staff experience and the need for their support. Cancer patients and oncology nurses have many needs, and support is one of the basic ones. This study aimed to explore supportive activities in the oncology ward during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Material and methods. This qualitative study was conducted in Eastern and Southeastern Iran in 2020 and 2021 through a conventional content analysis approach. The participants included 21 (10 oncology nurses, 5 managers, and 6 cancer patients), who were selected through purposive sampling. To collect data, in-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews were done. Interviews were continued until data saturation was achieved. After transcribing the interviews, the data were analyzed according to the steps proposed by Graneheim & Lundman. 

Results. The results consisted of three main themes and nine categories, namely the perceive of threat in supportive atmosphere in the oncology ward (cancer patients’ sense of desperation and need for support, difficulty of working in the department, close relationships governing the ward), Seeking support in the oncology ward (Professional support, patient advocacy), and supportive divergence (poor family support, perceived poor social support, unsupportive behaviors, Being far from the supportive standards of working in an oncology ward). 

Conclusions. The results of the study have shown that the supportive activities in the oncology ward during the COVID-19 pandemic are affected by various factors. The experiences of participants provide new insight into supportive activities around managing oncology wards supportive needs during such stressful times.

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Keywords

COVID-19; Iran; social support; neoplasms; stress; psychological atmosphere

About this article
Title

Supportive activities in oncological wards during the COVID-19 pandemic: a qualitative study

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2022-04-26

Page views

138

Article views/downloads

103

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2022.0017

Keywords

COVID-19
Iran
social support
neoplasms
stress
psychological atmosphere

Authors

Mahdieh Poodineh Moghadam
Ahmad Nasiri
Gholamhossein Mahmoudirad

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