open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2018)
Case report
Published online: 2019-02-15
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The use of everolimus in a patient with metastatic atypical bronchial carcinoid undergoing haemodialysis: a single-centre experience with one case

Anita Gorzelak1, Ewa Wachuła1, Agnieszka Boratyn-Nowicka1
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2018.0035
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2018;14(5):278-281.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Oncology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland, Ceglana35, 40-527 Katowice, Poland

open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2018)
CASE REPORT
Published online: 2019-02-15

Abstract

Background. The treatment of lung neuroendocrine tumours is still a challenge due to their rare occurrence and the lack of prospective randomised studies. We present the case of patient with metastatic atypical lung carcinoid treated with everolimus undergoing haemodialysis due to end-stage renal failure as a result of renal cirrhosis. Methods. A 68-year-old man was followed up in our hospital for an atypical lung carcinoid diagnosed in 2006. The patient initially underwent left upper lobectomy for a well-differentiated tumour — atypical carcinoid. Pathology stage was pT3N0M0PL0 (Ki67 3%). Nine years later, the evaluation revealed a progressive disease (metastases in the liver, bones, and spleen). Hepatic metastasectomy was performed and progression of carcinoid (Ki67 1%) was confirmed. In the same year end-stage renal failure as a result of renal cirrhosis was diagnosed and the patient required dialysis three times a week. The patient was qualified to start the treatment with somatostatin analogues by multidisciplinary team. In February 2017, new liver metastases occurred. Due to clinical symptoms (flush, diarrhoea) associated with hormonal activity (serotonin, chromogranin A), the decision to use molecular-targeted therapy with everolimus was made. In February 2017, everolimus therapy at the full dose of 10 mg daily was initiated. Results. The evaluation of treatment effects after 12 weeks of everolimus administration revealed the decrease of chromogranin A and serotonin levels with stabilisation of the hepatic metastases on computed tomography scans — stable disease according to RECIST criteria was found. At the time of publication, the patient was receiving everolimus, somatostatin analogues, and dialysis therapy. Conclusions. Targeted therapy with everolimus seems to be very promising for patients with lung carcinoid and renal failure, but further trials need to be conducted.

Abstract

Background. The treatment of lung neuroendocrine tumours is still a challenge due to their rare occurrence and the lack of prospective randomised studies. We present the case of patient with metastatic atypical lung carcinoid treated with everolimus undergoing haemodialysis due to end-stage renal failure as a result of renal cirrhosis. Methods. A 68-year-old man was followed up in our hospital for an atypical lung carcinoid diagnosed in 2006. The patient initially underwent left upper lobectomy for a well-differentiated tumour — atypical carcinoid. Pathology stage was pT3N0M0PL0 (Ki67 3%). Nine years later, the evaluation revealed a progressive disease (metastases in the liver, bones, and spleen). Hepatic metastasectomy was performed and progression of carcinoid (Ki67 1%) was confirmed. In the same year end-stage renal failure as a result of renal cirrhosis was diagnosed and the patient required dialysis three times a week. The patient was qualified to start the treatment with somatostatin analogues by multidisciplinary team. In February 2017, new liver metastases occurred. Due to clinical symptoms (flush, diarrhoea) associated with hormonal activity (serotonin, chromogranin A), the decision to use molecular-targeted therapy with everolimus was made. In February 2017, everolimus therapy at the full dose of 10 mg daily was initiated. Results. The evaluation of treatment effects after 12 weeks of everolimus administration revealed the decrease of chromogranin A and serotonin levels with stabilisation of the hepatic metastases on computed tomography scans — stable disease according to RECIST criteria was found. At the time of publication, the patient was receiving everolimus, somatostatin analogues, and dialysis therapy. Conclusions. Targeted therapy with everolimus seems to be very promising for patients with lung carcinoid and renal failure, but further trials need to be conducted.

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Keywords

bronchial carcinoid; everolimus; renal failure; haemodialysis

About this article
Title

The use of everolimus in a patient with metastatic atypical bronchial carcinoid undergoing haemodialysis: a single-centre experience with one case

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 14, No 5 (2018)

Article type

Case report

Pages

278-281

Published online

2019-02-15

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2018.0035

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2018;14(5):278-281.

Keywords

bronchial carcinoid
everolimus
renal failure
haemodialysis

Authors

Anita Gorzelak
Ewa Wachuła
Agnieszka Boratyn-Nowicka

References (13)
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