open access

Vol 5, No 2 (2009)
Review paper
Published online: 2009-04-20
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Constipation in opioid-treated patients

Tomasz Dzierżanowski, Jerzy Jarosz
Onkol. Prak. Klin 2009;5(2):47-54.

open access

Vol 5, No 2 (2009)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2009-04-20

Abstract

Constipation in opioid treated patients is typical side effect of opioid use of negative impact on the patients’ quality of life. The main mechanism of it occurance is the activity of opioid peropherally localized in the intestine wall receptors agonists. There are other factors influing the clinical status e.g. an advanced diesease, movability limits and dietetary restrictions. The constipation management requires a multidisciplinary approach. The traditional laxatives are of limited efficacy in the opioid-related constipations. An effective treatment could be a use of opioid agonists that are not passing the blood-brain barier so they are unable to antagonize central analgesic effect nor cause the abstinence symptoms.These are exactly the features of recently registered in Europe and available in Poland metylnaltrexone.

Abstract

Constipation in opioid treated patients is typical side effect of opioid use of negative impact on the patients’ quality of life. The main mechanism of it occurance is the activity of opioid peropherally localized in the intestine wall receptors agonists. There are other factors influing the clinical status e.g. an advanced diesease, movability limits and dietetary restrictions. The constipation management requires a multidisciplinary approach. The traditional laxatives are of limited efficacy in the opioid-related constipations. An effective treatment could be a use of opioid agonists that are not passing the blood-brain barier so they are unable to antagonize central analgesic effect nor cause the abstinence symptoms.These are exactly the features of recently registered in Europe and available in Poland metylnaltrexone.
Get Citation

Keywords

opioids; constipation; palliative care; cancer pain

About this article
Title

Constipation in opioid-treated patients

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 5, No 2 (2009)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

47-54

Published online

2009-04-20

Bibliographic record

Onkol. Prak. Klin 2009;5(2):47-54.

Keywords

opioids
constipation
palliative care
cancer pain

Authors

Tomasz Dzierżanowski
Jerzy Jarosz

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