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Vol 6, No 1 (2010)
Review paper
Published online: 2010-05-06
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Sequential therapy with focus on TKI’s in treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

Jakub Żołnierek
Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(1):21-28.

open access

Vol 6, No 1 (2010)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2010-05-06

Abstract

Till recently the immunotherapy was the only option of systemic treatment in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients - in Poland based on interferon a, rarely interleukin 2. Unfortunately this method of therapy has limited efficiacy nevertheless the potential generation of complete remissions (low percentage of treated patients), usually equal to cure, is the unquestionable advantage of its use. Novel drugs - thyrosine and serine-threonine kinases inhibitors and monoclonal antybodies have been broadly used in clinical practice for several years now. Due to their use the objective responses are seen more often. The problem is that despite the fact they significantly prolong progression free survival, their impact on overall survival is not clear and complete remissions are casuistic. Still the aim of pharmacotherapy is to decelerate the tumor growth and to delay the moment it reaches its critical burden. In fact the cure is still impossible. The sequential therapy is the option to improve clinical benefit of pharmacotherapy in this disease. There is growing body of evidence supporting clinical value of this strategy. The paper is the short discussion of the problem.

Abstract

Till recently the immunotherapy was the only option of systemic treatment in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients - in Poland based on interferon a, rarely interleukin 2. Unfortunately this method of therapy has limited efficiacy nevertheless the potential generation of complete remissions (low percentage of treated patients), usually equal to cure, is the unquestionable advantage of its use. Novel drugs - thyrosine and serine-threonine kinases inhibitors and monoclonal antybodies have been broadly used in clinical practice for several years now. Due to their use the objective responses are seen more often. The problem is that despite the fact they significantly prolong progression free survival, their impact on overall survival is not clear and complete remissions are casuistic. Still the aim of pharmacotherapy is to decelerate the tumor growth and to delay the moment it reaches its critical burden. In fact the cure is still impossible. The sequential therapy is the option to improve clinical benefit of pharmacotherapy in this disease. There is growing body of evidence supporting clinical value of this strategy. The paper is the short discussion of the problem.
Get Citation

Keywords

metastatic renal cell cancer; targeted therapy; thyrosine and serine-threonine kinases inhibitors; monoclonal antybodies; sequential therapy

About this article
Title

Sequential therapy with focus on TKI’s in treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 6, No 1 (2010)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

21-28

Published online

2010-05-06

Bibliographic record

Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(1):21-28.

Keywords

metastatic renal cell cancer
targeted therapy
thyrosine and serine-threonine kinases inhibitors
monoclonal antybodies
sequential therapy

Authors

Jakub Żołnierek

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