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Vol 6, No 2 (2010)
Review paper
Published online: 2010-06-25
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Post-transplant cancers

Adam Płużański, Paweł Badurak, Maciej Krzakowski
Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(2):53-61.

open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2010)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2010-06-25

Abstract

The progress in transplantology and use of new immunosuppressants improved survival time of patients after transplantation. Malignancies are the main cause of death patients with functioning graft. Skin malignancies other than melanoma are the most frequent neoplasms in patients with kidney and liver transplantations. The highest incidence of malignancies after transplantation is related to potential oncogenic viral infection such as Kaposi`s sarcoma caused by human herpes virus type 8, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder caused by Epstein-Barr virus and malignancies probably caused by human papilloma virus or hepatitis B/C virus. Risk of solid tumor incidence according to some investigators is 2-4 times higher than in general population. Lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers and urinary tract tumors are observed in less than 1% of patients after liver transplantation. The most common malignancies in patients after heart transplantation are lymphomas, lung cancer, urinary tract malignancies and skin neoplasms. Age, high dose of immunosuppressants, life style and egzogenic cancerogenous factors exposure are the main risk factors in patients after organ transplantations. Risk of malignancy after transplantation is higher in case of use calcineurin inhibitors than other agents. Immunosuppressive treatment not only may determine type and frequency of malignancy, but also worsens prognosis independently of clinical stage of niewydoldisease compared to general population. Use of new immunosuppressants with specific antineoplastic activity may reduce the incidence of the neoplasms after organ transplantation.
Onkol. Prak. Klin. 2010; 6, 2: 53-61

Abstract

The progress in transplantology and use of new immunosuppressants improved survival time of patients after transplantation. Malignancies are the main cause of death patients with functioning graft. Skin malignancies other than melanoma are the most frequent neoplasms in patients with kidney and liver transplantations. The highest incidence of malignancies after transplantation is related to potential oncogenic viral infection such as Kaposi`s sarcoma caused by human herpes virus type 8, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder caused by Epstein-Barr virus and malignancies probably caused by human papilloma virus or hepatitis B/C virus. Risk of solid tumor incidence according to some investigators is 2-4 times higher than in general population. Lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers and urinary tract tumors are observed in less than 1% of patients after liver transplantation. The most common malignancies in patients after heart transplantation are lymphomas, lung cancer, urinary tract malignancies and skin neoplasms. Age, high dose of immunosuppressants, life style and egzogenic cancerogenous factors exposure are the main risk factors in patients after organ transplantations. Risk of malignancy after transplantation is higher in case of use calcineurin inhibitors than other agents. Immunosuppressive treatment not only may determine type and frequency of malignancy, but also worsens prognosis independently of clinical stage of niewydoldisease compared to general population. Use of new immunosuppressants with specific antineoplastic activity may reduce the incidence of the neoplasms after organ transplantation.
Onkol. Prak. Klin. 2010; 6, 2: 53-61
Get Citation

Keywords

organ transplantation; malignancy; immunosuppression

About this article
Title

Post-transplant cancers

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 6, No 2 (2010)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

53-61

Published online

2010-06-25

Bibliographic record

Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(2):53-61.

Keywords

organ transplantation
malignancy
immunosuppression

Authors

Adam Płużański
Paweł Badurak
Maciej Krzakowski

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