open access

Vol 6, No 6 (2010)
Review paper
Published online: 2011-02-24
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Hormonotherapy in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer

Sylwia Dębska, Piotr Potemski
Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(6):301-310.

open access

Vol 6, No 6 (2010)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2011-02-24

Abstract

About 75% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor-positive. Approximately 10% of them is HER2-positive as well. Palliative and adjuvant hormonotherapy is an effective treatment, which prolongs survival in women with hormonal receptor-positive breast cancer. HER2 overexpression despite of being a negative prognostic factor also predicts reduced benefit from hormonotherapy.
The reason for that is that signaling of estrogen receptors crosstalks with signal pathways of growth factor receptors. This phenomenon may lead to the development of hormonoresistance.
The present article is a review of the most important clinical trials of hormonotherapy and combined hormonal and anti-HER2 treatment in patients with co-expression of steroid receptors and HER2.

Onkol. Prak. Klin. 2010; 6, 6: 301–310

Abstract

About 75% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor-positive. Approximately 10% of them is HER2-positive as well. Palliative and adjuvant hormonotherapy is an effective treatment, which prolongs survival in women with hormonal receptor-positive breast cancer. HER2 overexpression despite of being a negative prognostic factor also predicts reduced benefit from hormonotherapy.
The reason for that is that signaling of estrogen receptors crosstalks with signal pathways of growth factor receptors. This phenomenon may lead to the development of hormonoresistance.
The present article is a review of the most important clinical trials of hormonotherapy and combined hormonal and anti-HER2 treatment in patients with co-expression of steroid receptors and HER2.

Onkol. Prak. Klin. 2010; 6, 6: 301–310

Get Citation

Keywords

breast cancer; estrogen receptor; HER2; hormonotherapy; trastuzumab; lapatinib

About this article
Title

Hormonotherapy in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 6, No 6 (2010)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

301-310

Published online

2011-02-24

Bibliographic record

Onkol. Prak. Klin 2010;6(6):301-310.

Keywords

breast cancer
estrogen receptor
HER2
hormonotherapy
trastuzumab
lapatinib

Authors

Sylwia Dębska
Piotr Potemski

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