open access

Vol 15, No 6 (2019)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-01-10
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Molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer as a potential prognostic and predictive factor in the selection of the optimal treatment strategy

Marta Frąckowiak, Tomasz Lewandowski, Paweł Stelmasiak
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2019.0036
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2019;15(6):320-325.

open access

Vol 15, No 6 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-01-10

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the third cause of death from malignant tumours. In recent years, a consensus has been developed that distinguishes four subtypes of colon cancer (CMS, consensus molecular subtypes): CMS1 — immunological, CMS2 — canonical, CMS3 — metabolic, and CMS4 — mesenchymal. They differ in terms of clinical course and response to chemotherapy and biological treatment. The practical application of molecular classification can be helpful as a prognostic and predictive factor in the selection of an optimal and individualised strategy for the treatment of individual patients.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the third cause of death from malignant tumours. In recent years, a consensus has been developed that distinguishes four subtypes of colon cancer (CMS, consensus molecular subtypes): CMS1 — immunological, CMS2 — canonical, CMS3 — metabolic, and CMS4 — mesenchymal. They differ in terms of clinical course and response to chemotherapy and biological treatment. The practical application of molecular classification can be helpful as a prognostic and predictive factor in the selection of an optimal and individualised strategy for the treatment of individual patients.

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Keywords

colon cancer; CMS; chemotherapy; molecular-targeted treatment

About this article
Title

Molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer as a potential prognostic and predictive factor in the selection of the optimal treatment strategy

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 15, No 6 (2019)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

320-325

Published online

2020-01-10

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2019.0036

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2019;15(6):320-325.

Keywords

colon cancer
CMS
chemotherapy
molecular-targeted treatment

Authors

Marta Frąckowiak
Tomasz Lewandowski
Paweł Stelmasiak

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