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Vol 14, No 5 (2018)
Review paper
Published online: 2019-02-15
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Anti-cancer agents and endothelium

Renata Pacholczak, Jerzy Dropiński, Jerzy Walocha, Jacek Musiał
DOI: 10.5603/OCP.2018.0032
·
Oncol Clin Pract 2018;14(5):249-256.

open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2018)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-15

Abstract

Recent advances in oncology have improved the treatment outcomes and life expectancy of cancer patients; therefore, late effects of oncological treatment are of high clinical importance. Recent studies have shown that cardiovascular events are among the leading causes of premature morbidity in cancer survivors. Cardiotoxicity of some chemotherapeutic agents have been already confirmed; however, this issue seems to be more complex. Endothelium dysfunction is one of the first recognisable signs of atherosclerosis, which occurs long before the development of overt cardiovascular disease. Thus, it could be considered as an initial step, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular events. This process is not easy to recognise; however, there are some laboratory tests and imagining techniques that provide an insight into the progression of endothelial dysfunction. In this review we discuss the influence of oncological treatment on endothelium, according to the hypothesis that it increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Additionally, we present diagnostic and therapeutic measures that could reduce cardiovascular risk in cancer patients.

Abstract

Recent advances in oncology have improved the treatment outcomes and life expectancy of cancer patients; therefore, late effects of oncological treatment are of high clinical importance. Recent studies have shown that cardiovascular events are among the leading causes of premature morbidity in cancer survivors. Cardiotoxicity of some chemotherapeutic agents have been already confirmed; however, this issue seems to be more complex. Endothelium dysfunction is one of the first recognisable signs of atherosclerosis, which occurs long before the development of overt cardiovascular disease. Thus, it could be considered as an initial step, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular events. This process is not easy to recognise; however, there are some laboratory tests and imagining techniques that provide an insight into the progression of endothelial dysfunction. In this review we discuss the influence of oncological treatment on endothelium, according to the hypothesis that it increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Additionally, we present diagnostic and therapeutic measures that could reduce cardiovascular risk in cancer patients.
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Keywords

endothelium; cancer; chemotherapeutic agents; radiotherapy

About this article
Title

Anti-cancer agents and endothelium

Journal

Oncology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 14, No 5 (2018)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

249-256

Published online

2019-02-15

DOI

10.5603/OCP.2018.0032

Bibliographic record

Oncol Clin Pract 2018;14(5):249-256.

Keywords

endothelium
cancer
chemotherapeutic agents
radiotherapy

Authors

Renata Pacholczak
Jerzy Dropiński
Jerzy Walocha
Jacek Musiał

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