open access

Vol 21, No 1 (2018)
Reviews
Published online: 2018-01-10
Submitted: 2017-10-19
Accepted: 2018-01-09
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Significance of splenic uptake on somatostatin receptor imaging studies

Ismet Sarikaya, Ali Sarikaya, Naheel Alnafisi, Saud Alenezi
DOI: 10.5603/NMR.a2018.0012
·
Pubmed: 29319140
·
Nucl. Med. Rev 2018;21(1):66-70.

open access

Vol 21, No 1 (2018)
Reviews
Published online: 2018-01-10
Submitted: 2017-10-19
Accepted: 2018-01-09

Abstract

Spleen shows a high physiological uptake on radionuclide somatostatin receptor (SSTR) imaging studies. Autoradiography and immunohistochemistry studies showed that SSTRs are mainly located in the red pulp of the spleen. In this review article we will summarize the significance of splenic uptake in SSTR imaging studies and will also present high resolution splenic images of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET in which splenic distribution of the radiotracer appears to be correlating with the distribution of red pulp.

Abstract

Spleen shows a high physiological uptake on radionuclide somatostatin receptor (SSTR) imaging studies. Autoradiography and immunohistochemistry studies showed that SSTRs are mainly located in the red pulp of the spleen. In this review article we will summarize the significance of splenic uptake in SSTR imaging studies and will also present high resolution splenic images of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET in which splenic distribution of the radiotracer appears to be correlating with the distribution of red pulp.

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Keywords

Spleen, somatostatin receptor, SSTR, radionuclide, red pulp, scintigraphy, Ga-68 DOTANOC

About this article
Title

Significance of splenic uptake on somatostatin receptor imaging studies

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 21, No 1 (2018)

Pages

66-70

Published online

2018-01-10

DOI

10.5603/NMR.a2018.0012

Pubmed

29319140

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2018;21(1):66-70.

Keywords

Spleen
somatostatin receptor
SSTR
radionuclide
red pulp
scintigraphy
Ga-68 DOTANOC

Authors

Ismet Sarikaya
Ali Sarikaya
Naheel Alnafisi
Saud Alenezi

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