open access

Vol 5, No 1 (2002)
Editorial
Published online: 2002-01-17
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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Radioiodine-treatment (RIT) of functional thyroidal autonomy

Johannes Meller, C.O. Sahlman, Wolfgang Becker
Nucl. Med. Rev 2002;5(1):1-10.

open access

Vol 5, No 1 (2002)
Editorial
Published online: 2002-01-17
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract

Since 1942, therapy with radioiodine (RIT) has gained a major role in the treatment of benign thyroid disorders, notably hyperthyroidism caused by Graves’ disease or toxic multinodular goitre (thyroid autonomy). In iodine deficient areas thyroid autonomy accounts for 40-50% of all cases with hyperthyroidism. RIT has become a cost-effective first-line procedure in autonomy-patients with latent or overt hyperthyroidism, especially in the absence of a large goitre, after thyroid surgery and in elderly patients with associated conditions who carry a high intra- or perioperative risk. Decisions concerning the definitive treatment of thyroid autonomy should take into account previous episodes of hyperthyroidism, objective parameters of risk stratification in euthyroid patients as well as concomitant diseases and the probability of iodine exposure in the future. In Central Europe the majority of investigators prefer to estimate the therapeutic activity individually by a radioiodine test. TCTUs (global 99m-Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression) - based dose concepts have been proven to be highly effective in the elimination of autonomy and carry a low (< 10%) risk of postradioiodtherapeutic hypothyroidism. Radioiodine therapy for autonomy has been found to be both effective and safe and without major early or late side effects. The most frequent complication is hypothyroidism requiring lifelong follow-up.

Abstract

Since 1942, therapy with radioiodine (RIT) has gained a major role in the treatment of benign thyroid disorders, notably hyperthyroidism caused by Graves’ disease or toxic multinodular goitre (thyroid autonomy). In iodine deficient areas thyroid autonomy accounts for 40-50% of all cases with hyperthyroidism. RIT has become a cost-effective first-line procedure in autonomy-patients with latent or overt hyperthyroidism, especially in the absence of a large goitre, after thyroid surgery and in elderly patients with associated conditions who carry a high intra- or perioperative risk. Decisions concerning the definitive treatment of thyroid autonomy should take into account previous episodes of hyperthyroidism, objective parameters of risk stratification in euthyroid patients as well as concomitant diseases and the probability of iodine exposure in the future. In Central Europe the majority of investigators prefer to estimate the therapeutic activity individually by a radioiodine test. TCTUs (global 99m-Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression) - based dose concepts have been proven to be highly effective in the elimination of autonomy and carry a low (< 10%) risk of postradioiodtherapeutic hypothyroidism. Radioiodine therapy for autonomy has been found to be both effective and safe and without major early or late side effects. The most frequent complication is hypothyroidism requiring lifelong follow-up.
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Keywords

thyroid autonomy; TCTUs; I-131; toxic multinodular goitre; radioiodine therapy

About this article
Title

Radioiodine-treatment (RIT) of functional thyroidal autonomy

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 5, No 1 (2002)

Pages

1-10

Published online

2002-01-17

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2002;5(1):1-10.

Keywords

thyroid autonomy
TCTUs
I-131
toxic multinodular goitre
radioiodine therapy

Authors

Johannes Meller
C.O. Sahlman
Wolfgang Becker

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