open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2003)
Published online: 2003-10-10
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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Radioidine therapy temporarily increases circulating endothelial cells and decreases endothelial progenitor cells

Barbara Palumbo, Renato Palumbo, Helmut Sinzinger
Nucl. Med. Rev 2003;6(2):123-126.

open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2003)
Published online: 2003-10-10
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy can cause vascular injury. No data on radioiodine therapy and vascular damage are available.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We examined the number of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPC) before therapy 1, 2, 3 and 5 days as well as 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after therapy with 131I at doses ranging from 5–200 mCi. The individual number of CEC and CEPC is associated with the presence of risk factors.
RESULTS: Irrespective of prevalues, CEC exhibited a significant dose-dependent temporary increase reaching the maximum in weeks 1 and 2. In contrast, CEPC show a decrease at the same time.
CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that 131I-therapy induces a dose-dependent radiation injury at the vascular wall level enhancing endothelial desquamation and reducing reendothelialization and thereby a proatherogenic stage. The clinical consequence of these findings still needs to be assessed.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy can cause vascular injury. No data on radioiodine therapy and vascular damage are available.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We examined the number of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPC) before therapy 1, 2, 3 and 5 days as well as 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks after therapy with 131I at doses ranging from 5–200 mCi. The individual number of CEC and CEPC is associated with the presence of risk factors.
RESULTS: Irrespective of prevalues, CEC exhibited a significant dose-dependent temporary increase reaching the maximum in weeks 1 and 2. In contrast, CEPC show a decrease at the same time.
CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that 131I-therapy induces a dose-dependent radiation injury at the vascular wall level enhancing endothelial desquamation and reducing reendothelialization and thereby a proatherogenic stage. The clinical consequence of these findings still needs to be assessed.
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Keywords

radioiodine therapy; thyroid cancer; circulating endothelial cells; radiation injury

About this article
Title

Radioidine therapy temporarily increases circulating endothelial cells and decreases endothelial progenitor cells

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 6, No 2 (2003)

Pages

123-126

Published online

2003-10-10

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2003;6(2):123-126.

Keywords

radioiodine therapy
thyroid cancer
circulating endothelial cells
radiation injury

Authors

Barbara Palumbo
Renato Palumbo
Helmut Sinzinger

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