open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2005)
Short communications
Published online: 2005-06-23
Submitted: 2012-01-23
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Evaluation of sentinel node detection in vulvar cancer

Dariusz Wydra, Sambor Sawicki, Janusz Emerich, Grzegorz Romanowicz
Nucl. Med. Rev 2005;8(2):128-130.

open access

Vol 8, No 2 (2005)
Short communications
Published online: 2005-06-23
Submitted: 2012-01-23

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In vulvar cancer, in a large portion of patients with early stages of the disease, the inguinal lymphadenectomy not only does not influence the overall survival and recurrence rate but may increase the incidence of complications. Sentinel lymph node (SN) detection is a promising technique for detecting groin lymph nodes, which may in future lead to less extensive use of surgical treatment. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of the sentinel node detection technique in patients with vulvar cancer.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between the years 2003 and 2005, we performed intraoperative lymphatic mapping on 10 patients with planoepithelial vulvar cancer. In eight cases, vulvar lesion was localized centrally, around the clitoris. The extent of the surgery included radical vulvectomy with bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy in nine cases and unilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy in one case. For the lymphatic mapping, we employed two detection methods: 99mTc-labelled radiocolloid (activity 35-70 MBq) and blue dye (3-5 ml). Both techniques were used in six cases (60%), blue dye only in three cases and radiocolloid only in one case.
RESULTS: In each patient, we detected at least one sentinel lymph node. Sentinel nodes were localized in 14 of 19 operated groins (73.7%); a total of 25 SNs in all. The mean number of SNs for one groin was 1.78. Nodal metastases were found in four cases. In three cases, metastases were detected only in the SN. In one patient, two SNs with metastases were found in one groin and in the contralateral groin (without any SN) there was one unchanged node, which transpired to be metastatic. This can be explained by a complete overgrowth of neoplasm in the lymph node resulting in lymph flow stasis and disabling tracer uptake. In five cases, an SN was found only in one groin ó the first case is described above, in the second case the vulvar tumor was localized laterally, opposite to the groin without any SN. In the remaining three cases, we have used only one method of SN detection.
CONCLUSIONS: Lymphatic mapping in vulvar cancer based on the combined detection technique is a highly accurate method after adequate training of the surgeons.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In vulvar cancer, in a large portion of patients with early stages of the disease, the inguinal lymphadenectomy not only does not influence the overall survival and recurrence rate but may increase the incidence of complications. Sentinel lymph node (SN) detection is a promising technique for detecting groin lymph nodes, which may in future lead to less extensive use of surgical treatment. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of the sentinel node detection technique in patients with vulvar cancer.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between the years 2003 and 2005, we performed intraoperative lymphatic mapping on 10 patients with planoepithelial vulvar cancer. In eight cases, vulvar lesion was localized centrally, around the clitoris. The extent of the surgery included radical vulvectomy with bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy in nine cases and unilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy in one case. For the lymphatic mapping, we employed two detection methods: 99mTc-labelled radiocolloid (activity 35-70 MBq) and blue dye (3-5 ml). Both techniques were used in six cases (60%), blue dye only in three cases and radiocolloid only in one case.
RESULTS: In each patient, we detected at least one sentinel lymph node. Sentinel nodes were localized in 14 of 19 operated groins (73.7%); a total of 25 SNs in all. The mean number of SNs for one groin was 1.78. Nodal metastases were found in four cases. In three cases, metastases were detected only in the SN. In one patient, two SNs with metastases were found in one groin and in the contralateral groin (without any SN) there was one unchanged node, which transpired to be metastatic. This can be explained by a complete overgrowth of neoplasm in the lymph node resulting in lymph flow stasis and disabling tracer uptake. In five cases, an SN was found only in one groin ó the first case is described above, in the second case the vulvar tumor was localized laterally, opposite to the groin without any SN. In the remaining three cases, we have used only one method of SN detection.
CONCLUSIONS: Lymphatic mapping in vulvar cancer based on the combined detection technique is a highly accurate method after adequate training of the surgeons.
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Keywords

vulvar cancer; sentinel lymph node

About this article
Title

Evaluation of sentinel node detection in vulvar cancer

Journal

Nuclear Medicine Review

Issue

Vol 8, No 2 (2005)

Pages

128-130

Published online

2005-06-23

Bibliographic record

Nucl. Med. Rev 2005;8(2):128-130.

Keywords

vulvar cancer
sentinel lymph node

Authors

Dariusz Wydra
Sambor Sawicki
Janusz Emerich
Grzegorz Romanowicz

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