open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-04-12
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Cancer and rheumatic diseases. Methodological and clinical pitfalls in searching links between these diseases

Krzysztof Jeziorski12
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.a2022.0023
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):190-194.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Gerontology, Public Health and Didactics, National Institute of Geriatrics, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Warsaw, Poland
  2. Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Review article
Published online: 2022-04-12

Abstract

Results of studies on coexistence of rheumatic and oncological diseases are somewhat conflicting in the literature. This is probably due to various methodological problems of the conducted research such as: small groups of patients, possible Berkson’s bias, lack of information about the most important factors affecting the risk of developing cancer including lifestyle, body mass index, use of tobacco and alcohol, family history of cancer and autoimmune diseases, misclassification of diseases in administrative registries, differences including geographical, racial factors, and a relatively short observation period. The risk of cancer development or recurrence in patients treated for rheumatic disease is very low, estimated as 2–5 cases per 1000 patients treated annually, and even lower in patients with cured cancer and 5 years after completion of oncological treatment. In the absence of clear recommendations for cancer screening of patients with rheumatic diseases, there is a need to develop guidelines for screening.

Abstract

Results of studies on coexistence of rheumatic and oncological diseases are somewhat conflicting in the literature. This is probably due to various methodological problems of the conducted research such as: small groups of patients, possible Berkson’s bias, lack of information about the most important factors affecting the risk of developing cancer including lifestyle, body mass index, use of tobacco and alcohol, family history of cancer and autoimmune diseases, misclassification of diseases in administrative registries, differences including geographical, racial factors, and a relatively short observation period. The risk of cancer development or recurrence in patients treated for rheumatic disease is very low, estimated as 2–5 cases per 1000 patients treated annually, and even lower in patients with cured cancer and 5 years after completion of oncological treatment. In the absence of clear recommendations for cancer screening of patients with rheumatic diseases, there is a need to develop guidelines for screening.

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Keywords

cancer; rheumatologic diseases; screening; coexisting diseases and malignancies; multi-disease phenomenon

About this article
Title

Cancer and rheumatic diseases. Methodological and clinical pitfalls in searching links between these diseases

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

190-194

Published online

2022-04-12

Page views

46

Article views/downloads

30

DOI

10.5603/NJO.a2022.0023

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):190-194.

Keywords

cancer
rheumatologic diseases
screening
coexisting diseases and malignancies
multi-disease phenomenon

Authors

Krzysztof Jeziorski

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