open access

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-02-11
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The dose no longer plays a paramount role in radiotherapy (oncology), but time apparently does

Bogusław Maciejewski1, Krzysztof Składowski2
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.a2022.0009
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(2):80-85.
Affiliations
  1. Div. Research Programmes, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice, Poland
  2. Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy Clinic I, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)
Review article
Published online: 2022-02-11

Abstract

Overall 80 clinical data sets (head and neck, breast, lung and prostate) have been selected from the literature (about 10,000 patients) to analyze and compare the importance of the total dose (D) vs. overall therapy time (OTT). There was no correlation between local tumor control (LTC) and dose used as a single parameter. On the contrary, for tumors (la­rynx and cervix cancer) treated with a constant TCD50 ± 5%, any extension of the ORT resulted in a significant decrease of the LTC by about 1.5–2% per each one day extension of the ORT. Dose intensity (DI) expressed by the number of gray per unit of time (day) strongly correlated with the LTC, which significantly increases when the DI becomes larger than 7 Gy/day. The results lead to a final conclusion that suggests inverse order of the planned treatment parameters, i.e. TIME plays the primary role in treatment and the DOSE (and its fractionation) is a consequence of the primary choice.

Abstract

Overall 80 clinical data sets (head and neck, breast, lung and prostate) have been selected from the literature (about 10,000 patients) to analyze and compare the importance of the total dose (D) vs. overall therapy time (OTT). There was no correlation between local tumor control (LTC) and dose used as a single parameter. On the contrary, for tumors (la­rynx and cervix cancer) treated with a constant TCD50 ± 5%, any extension of the ORT resulted in a significant decrease of the LTC by about 1.5–2% per each one day extension of the ORT. Dose intensity (DI) expressed by the number of gray per unit of time (day) strongly correlated with the LTC, which significantly increases when the DI becomes larger than 7 Gy/day. The results lead to a final conclusion that suggests inverse order of the planned treatment parameters, i.e. TIME plays the primary role in treatment and the DOSE (and its fractionation) is a consequence of the primary choice.

Get Citation

Keywords

total dose; overall therapy time; dose intensity

About this article
Title

The dose no longer plays a paramount role in radiotherapy (oncology), but time apparently does

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

80-85

Published online

2022-02-11

Page views

328

Article views/downloads

65

DOI

10.5603/NJO.a2022.0009

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(2):80-85.

Keywords

total dose
overall therapy time
dose intensity

Authors

Bogusław Maciejewski
Krzysztof Składowski

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