open access

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)
Research paper (original)
Published online: 2022-02-10
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Sexual Health in breast cancer patients in Poland

Joanna Kufel-Grabowska1, Milena Lachowicz2, Mikołaj Bartoszkiewicz3, Rodryg Ramlau4, Daniel Maliszewski, Krzysztof Łukaszuk56
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.a2022.0008
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(2):74-79.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  2. Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland
  3. Department of Immunobiology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  4. Department of Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Science, Poznan, Poland
  5. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecological Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland
  6. INVICTA Fertility and Reproductive Center, Gdansk, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)
Original article
Published online: 2022-02-10

Abstract

Introduction.Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Poland and in the world, with a mor­tality rate second only to that of lung cancer. Breasts are one of the most important symbols of femininity and sexuality. Cancer surgery, but also systemic therapy (chemotherapy and hormone therapy) cause a change in the perception of one’s body. The aim of the survey proposed by us was to assess interest in sex by breast cancer patients during and after oncological treatment, as well as to identify ways to improve the quality of patients’ sex lives.

Materials and methods.The proposed survey consisted of 3 parts: the first part included questions about the demo­graphic, in the second part there were the author’s questions about sexual dysfunction (12 questions), in the third part there was the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) form assessing the sexual functioning of women. The questionna­ires were made available online from October 13, 2020 to December 20, 2020 through the social networks of patient organizations involved in breast cancer care. 287 women diagnosed with breast cancer were included in the survey.

Results.Before the disease almost all patients were sexually active and had a partner (95.5%; n = 274); at the time of filling the questionnaire only slightly more than half of the patients remained sexually active ( 57.1%; n = 164). About 30.7% (n = 88) stated that the disease was the main reason for not being sexually active. More than 60% of patients (60.9%; n = 137) used products to improve the comfort of sexual intercourse, mainly lubricants (39.7%; n = 114). Only about 1/3 of the patients (32.1%; n = 92) were satisfied with their sex life, 48.1% (n = 138) stated they were not satisfied with their sex life, 19.9% (n = 57) did not answer this question. The main reasons for lack of satisfaction with sex life included: decreased libido (65.9%; n = 189), vaginal dryness (55.1%; n = 158). The mean score of forms filled out by the respondents was 24.50 in FSFI form.

Conclusions.Assessment of sexual dysfunction in patients with breast cancer should be performed on a routine basis before treatment and regularly during treatment.

Abstract

Introduction.Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Poland and in the world, with a mor­tality rate second only to that of lung cancer. Breasts are one of the most important symbols of femininity and sexuality. Cancer surgery, but also systemic therapy (chemotherapy and hormone therapy) cause a change in the perception of one’s body. The aim of the survey proposed by us was to assess interest in sex by breast cancer patients during and after oncological treatment, as well as to identify ways to improve the quality of patients’ sex lives.

Materials and methods.The proposed survey consisted of 3 parts: the first part included questions about the demo­graphic, in the second part there were the author’s questions about sexual dysfunction (12 questions), in the third part there was the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) form assessing the sexual functioning of women. The questionna­ires were made available online from October 13, 2020 to December 20, 2020 through the social networks of patient organizations involved in breast cancer care. 287 women diagnosed with breast cancer were included in the survey.

Results.Before the disease almost all patients were sexually active and had a partner (95.5%; n = 274); at the time of filling the questionnaire only slightly more than half of the patients remained sexually active ( 57.1%; n = 164). About 30.7% (n = 88) stated that the disease was the main reason for not being sexually active. More than 60% of patients (60.9%; n = 137) used products to improve the comfort of sexual intercourse, mainly lubricants (39.7%; n = 114). Only about 1/3 of the patients (32.1%; n = 92) were satisfied with their sex life, 48.1% (n = 138) stated they were not satisfied with their sex life, 19.9% (n = 57) did not answer this question. The main reasons for lack of satisfaction with sex life included: decreased libido (65.9%; n = 189), vaginal dryness (55.1%; n = 158). The mean score of forms filled out by the respondents was 24.50 in FSFI form.

Conclusions.Assessment of sexual dysfunction in patients with breast cancer should be performed on a routine basis before treatment and regularly during treatment.

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Keywords

breast cancer; sexual health; FSFI; chemotherapy

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About this article
Title

Sexual Health in breast cancer patients in Poland

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Research paper (original)

Pages

74-79

Published online

2022-02-10

Page views

439

Article views/downloads

68

DOI

10.5603/NJO.a2022.0008

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(2):74-79.

Keywords

breast cancer
sexual health
FSFI
chemotherapy

Authors

Joanna Kufel-Grabowska
Milena Lachowicz
Mikołaj Bartoszkiewicz
Rodryg Ramlau
Daniel Maliszewski
Krzysztof Łukaszuk

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