open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Other materials agreed with the Editors
Published online: 2022-05-23
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The role of genetic counselling in oncology

Agnieszka Stembalska1, Karolina Pesz2
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.2022.0030
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):207-210.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Genetics, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
  2. Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom

open access

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)
Genetics and oncology
Published online: 2022-05-23

Abstract

All cancers are genetic disorders, but not all genetic disorders are inherited. Most cancers are sporadic, independent events that do not affect other family members. There is a population risk of developing any cancer and it mainly depends on the individual’s age and environmental factors. Cancers linked to predisposition syndromes constitute about 5–10% of all cancer cases. Although it is a small group, making the right diagnosis is important, because of the consequences to the individual, his/her relatives and the benefits they can acquire from surveillance, early therapy and/ or surgical interventions.

Genetic counselling plays an important role in diagnosing cancer predisposition syndromes. Hereditary cancer risk assessment includes evaluation of personal and family history, as well as other medical and environmental risk factors. Indications for genetic testing, scope of tests, possible results and their consequences for the patient and his/her family should be discussed.

Abstract

All cancers are genetic disorders, but not all genetic disorders are inherited. Most cancers are sporadic, independent events that do not affect other family members. There is a population risk of developing any cancer and it mainly depends on the individual’s age and environmental factors. Cancers linked to predisposition syndromes constitute about 5–10% of all cancer cases. Although it is a small group, making the right diagnosis is important, because of the consequences to the individual, his/her relatives and the benefits they can acquire from surveillance, early therapy and/ or surgical interventions.

Genetic counselling plays an important role in diagnosing cancer predisposition syndromes. Hereditary cancer risk assessment includes evaluation of personal and family history, as well as other medical and environmental risk factors. Indications for genetic testing, scope of tests, possible results and their consequences for the patient and his/her family should be discussed.

Get Citation

Keywords

cancer; predisposition; sporadic cancer; hereditary cancer; genetic counselling

About this article
Title

The role of genetic counselling in oncology

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Other materials agreed with the Editors

Pages

207-210

Published online

2022-05-23

Page views

395

Article views/downloads

58

DOI

10.5603/NJO.2022.0030

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(3):207-210.

Keywords

cancer
predisposition
sporadic cancer
hereditary cancer
genetic counselling

Authors

Agnieszka Stembalska
Karolina Pesz

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