open access

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-04-08
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How to manage radiation-induced dermatitis?

Dorota Kiprian1, Agata Szykut-Badaczewska2, Agnieszka Gradzińska2, Joanna Czuwara2, Lidia Rudnicka2
DOI: 10.5603/NJO.2022.0017
·
Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(2):86-95.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Head & Neck Cancer, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland
  2. Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland

open access

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)
Review article
Published online: 2022-04-08

Abstract

Radiotherapy is one of the treatment methods available for cancer patients. More than half of all cancer patients tre­ated with radiotherapy will experience radiodermatitis during their treatment. There are two commonly used scales to evaluate clinical manifestations: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. According to them, the severity of radiation dermatitis ranges from mild erythema to moist desquamation and ulceration. Prevention methods for radiation dermatitis include proper skin hygiene, the use of topical corticosteroids, other non-corticosteroid agents and systemic drugs. Treatment of radiation dermatitis is guided by the severity of skin damage. In grade 1 it can be limited to moisturising the irritated skin field but in more severe reactions (grade 2–4) the use of dressing is essential. There is still a need to investigate new products, techniques or novel approaches to minimize, prevent or treat radiation dermatitis in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

Abstract

Radiotherapy is one of the treatment methods available for cancer patients. More than half of all cancer patients tre­ated with radiotherapy will experience radiodermatitis during their treatment. There are two commonly used scales to evaluate clinical manifestations: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. According to them, the severity of radiation dermatitis ranges from mild erythema to moist desquamation and ulceration. Prevention methods for radiation dermatitis include proper skin hygiene, the use of topical corticosteroids, other non-corticosteroid agents and systemic drugs. Treatment of radiation dermatitis is guided by the severity of skin damage. In grade 1 it can be limited to moisturising the irritated skin field but in more severe reactions (grade 2–4) the use of dressing is essential. There is still a need to investigate new products, techniques or novel approaches to minimize, prevent or treat radiation dermatitis in patients undergoing radiotherapy.

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Keywords

radiation dermatitis; radiodermatitis; acute skin toxicity; radiotherapy

About this article
Title

How to manage radiation-induced dermatitis?

Journal

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology

Issue

Vol 72, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

86-95

Published online

2022-04-08

Page views

317

Article views/downloads

82

DOI

10.5603/NJO.2022.0017

Bibliographic record

Nowotwory. Journal of Oncology 2022;72(2):86-95.

Keywords

radiation dermatitis
radiodermatitis
acute skin toxicity
radiotherapy

Authors

Dorota Kiprian
Agata Szykut-Badaczewska
Agnieszka Gradzińska
Joanna Czuwara
Lidia Rudnicka

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