Vol 54, No 3 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-05-05
Submitted: 2019-09-21
Accepted: 2020-01-30
Get Citation

Late onset multiple sclerosis — multiparametric MRI characteristics

Łukasz Jasek, Janusz Śmigielski, Małgorzata Siger
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2020.0036
·
Pubmed: 32368786
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2020;54(3):265-271.

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Vol 54, No 3 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-05-05
Submitted: 2019-09-21
Accepted: 2020-01-30

Abstract

Introduction. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with heterogenic character. Typical age of onset is between 20 and 35 years. Clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) can occur also in patients older than 50 years. This type of MS is called Late Onset Multiple Sclerosis (LOMS). Until now, the differences in clinical course, type of first symptoms, and prognosis of LOMS have not been well established. Also the MRI characteristics of patients with LOMS have not been determined. Neither conventional nor nonconventional MRI features are known to be typical for LOMS.

Clinical rationale for the study. To investigate the MRI characteristics of LOMS patients based on conventional and non-conventional techniques.

Materials and methods. Twenty patients with LOMS were included in the study and 17 patients with typical onset of MS (TOMS) served as a comparative group. The two groups were matched in terms of disease duration and EDSS score. Conventional (T1- and T2-weighted images) and non-conventional (magnetization transfer images, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy) MRI techniques were performed in all participants. Parameters from both techniques were compared between LOMS and TOMS groups.

Results. Patients with late onset of MS had lower Brain Parenchyma Fraction (BPF) (p < 0.001) and Grey Matter Fraction (GMF) values (p = 0.008) than the TOMS group. There was no statistical differences in White Matter Fraction (WMF) values between the groups (p = 0.572). Patients with LOMS and TOMS statistically differed in the peak height (p = 0.018), peak location (p < 0.001), and MTR mean value (p < 0.001). Patients with LOMS manifested lower concentrations of NAA+NAAG and NAA+NAAG/Cr than patients with TOMS (p = 0.009 and p < 0.001 respectively). No statistical difference was found between the groups in terms of mean mIn (p = 0.346) and mean GPC+PCh (p = 0.563). We did not find a statistical difference in T1- and T2- lesion load (p = 0.1, p = 0.3 respectively) although T1/T2 lesion ratio was higher in the LOMS group.

Conclusion and clinical implications. MRI parameters in patients with LOMS differed significantly from those obtained from the TOMS group. Our results, which indicate that in LOMS patients brain tissue damage is more advanced than in TOMS patients, may contribute to a better understanding of the heterogeneity of MS.

Abstract

Introduction. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with heterogenic character. Typical age of onset is between 20 and 35 years. Clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) can occur also in patients older than 50 years. This type of MS is called Late Onset Multiple Sclerosis (LOMS). Until now, the differences in clinical course, type of first symptoms, and prognosis of LOMS have not been well established. Also the MRI characteristics of patients with LOMS have not been determined. Neither conventional nor nonconventional MRI features are known to be typical for LOMS.

Clinical rationale for the study. To investigate the MRI characteristics of LOMS patients based on conventional and non-conventional techniques.

Materials and methods. Twenty patients with LOMS were included in the study and 17 patients with typical onset of MS (TOMS) served as a comparative group. The two groups were matched in terms of disease duration and EDSS score. Conventional (T1- and T2-weighted images) and non-conventional (magnetization transfer images, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy) MRI techniques were performed in all participants. Parameters from both techniques were compared between LOMS and TOMS groups.

Results. Patients with late onset of MS had lower Brain Parenchyma Fraction (BPF) (p < 0.001) and Grey Matter Fraction (GMF) values (p = 0.008) than the TOMS group. There was no statistical differences in White Matter Fraction (WMF) values between the groups (p = 0.572). Patients with LOMS and TOMS statistically differed in the peak height (p = 0.018), peak location (p < 0.001), and MTR mean value (p < 0.001). Patients with LOMS manifested lower concentrations of NAA+NAAG and NAA+NAAG/Cr than patients with TOMS (p = 0.009 and p < 0.001 respectively). No statistical difference was found between the groups in terms of mean mIn (p = 0.346) and mean GPC+PCh (p = 0.563). We did not find a statistical difference in T1- and T2- lesion load (p = 0.1, p = 0.3 respectively) although T1/T2 lesion ratio was higher in the LOMS group.

Conclusion and clinical implications. MRI parameters in patients with LOMS differed significantly from those obtained from the TOMS group. Our results, which indicate that in LOMS patients brain tissue damage is more advanced than in TOMS patients, may contribute to a better understanding of the heterogeneity of MS.

Get Citation

Keywords

Late onset multiple sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, magnetic resonance imaging, brain atrophy, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetization transfer ratio

About this article
Title

Late onset multiple sclerosis — multiparametric MRI characteristics

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 54, No 3 (2020)

Pages

265-271

Published online

2020-05-05

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2020.0036

Pubmed

32368786

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2020;54(3):265-271.

Keywords

Late onset multiple sclerosis
multiple sclerosis
magnetic resonance imaging
brain atrophy
proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy
magnetization transfer ratio

Authors

Łukasz Jasek
Janusz Śmigielski
Małgorzata Siger

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