open access

Vol 54, No 2 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-02-26
Submitted: 2019-09-02
Accepted: 2019-12-16
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Risk factors for death by acute ischaemic stroke in patients from West-Pomerania, Poland

Paweł Wańkowicz, Monika Gołąb-Janowska, Przemysław Nowacki
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2020.0018
·
Pubmed: 32101324
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2020;54(2):150-155.

open access

Vol 54, No 2 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-02-26
Submitted: 2019-09-02
Accepted: 2019-12-16

Abstract

Aim and clinical rationale for study. In Poland, it is widely believed that the outlook for ischaemic stroke patients is gradually improving due to the development of a network of stroke wards and other dedicated hospital units throughout the country. However, a study by Shah et al., reporting a significant increase in mortality from ischaemic stroke in several European countries including Poland, contradicts this belief. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for death in patients with recent ischaemic stroke among a population of patients from Western Pomerania, a region in north-western Poland.

Materials and methods.
This retrospective study involved 2,374 patients with recent ischaemic stroke. Mortality was defined as death within 30 days of admission to hospital. Patients who died in hospital during this period were defined as deceased, while those who survived beyond this time were classified as alive.

Results.
We found that compared to ischaemic stroke patients who survived, the group of ischaemic stroke patients who died included a higher number of patients who smoked cigarettes (OR = 6.08 in univariable model; OR = 6.22 in adjusted model), had hypertension (OR = 2.57; OR = 1.85), had a history of previous stroke (OR = 2.63; OR = 2.14), had coronary heart disease (OR = 1.78; OR=1.36), and were older (OR = 1.06; OR = 1.05). For all these factors, p-value was lower than 0.001. Females had a higher risk of death (OR = 1.48, p < 0.001; OR = 1.35, p = 0.01). For dyslipidemia, only univariable model was statistically
significant (OR = 1.38, p < 0.001).

Conclusion and clinical implications. Older age, female sex, dyslipidemia, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and smoking are not only recognised risk factors for ischaemic stroke, but also risk factors associated with an unfavourable prognosis following stroke.

Abstract

Aim and clinical rationale for study. In Poland, it is widely believed that the outlook for ischaemic stroke patients is gradually improving due to the development of a network of stroke wards and other dedicated hospital units throughout the country. However, a study by Shah et al., reporting a significant increase in mortality from ischaemic stroke in several European countries including Poland, contradicts this belief. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for death in patients with recent ischaemic stroke among a population of patients from Western Pomerania, a region in north-western Poland.

Materials and methods.
This retrospective study involved 2,374 patients with recent ischaemic stroke. Mortality was defined as death within 30 days of admission to hospital. Patients who died in hospital during this period were defined as deceased, while those who survived beyond this time were classified as alive.

Results.
We found that compared to ischaemic stroke patients who survived, the group of ischaemic stroke patients who died included a higher number of patients who smoked cigarettes (OR = 6.08 in univariable model; OR = 6.22 in adjusted model), had hypertension (OR = 2.57; OR = 1.85), had a history of previous stroke (OR = 2.63; OR = 2.14), had coronary heart disease (OR = 1.78; OR=1.36), and were older (OR = 1.06; OR = 1.05). For all these factors, p-value was lower than 0.001. Females had a higher risk of death (OR = 1.48, p < 0.001; OR = 1.35, p = 0.01). For dyslipidemia, only univariable model was statistically
significant (OR = 1.38, p < 0.001).

Conclusion and clinical implications. Older age, female sex, dyslipidemia, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and smoking are not only recognised risk factors for ischaemic stroke, but also risk factors associated with an unfavourable prognosis following stroke.

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Keywords

ischaemic stroke, risk factors, death, Poland

About this article
Title

Risk factors for death by acute ischaemic stroke in patients from West-Pomerania, Poland

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 54, No 2 (2020)

Pages

150-155

Published online

2020-02-26

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2020.0018

Pubmed

32101324

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2020;54(2):150-155.

Keywords

ischaemic stroke
risk factors
death
Poland

Authors

Paweł Wańkowicz
Monika Gołąb-Janowska
Przemysław Nowacki

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