open access

Vol 53, No 2 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-03-11
Submitted: 2019-01-22
Accepted: 2019-01-22
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Analysis of echocardiographic parameters of cardiac function in patients with acute stroke

Anetta Lasek-Bal, Amadeusz Żak, Piotr Pysz, Przemysław Puz, Zbigniew Gąsior
DOI: 10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0012
·
Pubmed: 30855702
·
Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(2):144-149.

open access

Vol 53, No 2 (2019)
Research paper
Published online: 2019-03-11
Submitted: 2019-01-22
Accepted: 2019-01-22

Abstract

Introduction. Cardiologic diagnostics in stroke patients is designed to identify heart disease as a potential cause of stroke. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular systolic/diastolic dysfunction (LVSD, LVDD) on the neurological state on the 1st day of stroke, as well as post-stroke functional status at 30 days after stroke.

Patients and methods. For a prospective study, 162 stroke patients (mean age 74 years) were qualified. They were analysed according to neurological state on the 1st day of stroke, the results of transthoracic echocardiography, and functional status at 30 days after stroke.

Results. The neurological state on the 1st day after stroke was significantly worse in patients with LVSD. In patients with reduced EF, functional status was significantly worse at 30 days after stroke. Patients with E/A 0.8–2 had a significantly worse functional status compared to patients with E/A < 0.8. Individuals with E/A 0.8–2 and segmental LVSD or EF < 50% had significantly worse functional status compared to patients without LVSD. An independent factor for moderate/severe status was identified: E/A > 0.8 (RR 3.28 [95% CI 1.15-9.37]); independent factors for poor functional status were lower EF (RR 4.68 [95% CI 1.22–18.00]) and age (RR 4.68 [95% CI 1.22–11.00]).

Conclusions. One quarter of patients in the acute phase of stroke have LVSD and/or LVDD. LVSD adversely affects both neurological status in acute stroke as well as functional status in the short-term follow-up. Age at first-in-life stroke incidence and lower EF are predictors of poor functional status one month after a stroke.

Abstract

Introduction. Cardiologic diagnostics in stroke patients is designed to identify heart disease as a potential cause of stroke. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular systolic/diastolic dysfunction (LVSD, LVDD) on the neurological state on the 1st day of stroke, as well as post-stroke functional status at 30 days after stroke.

Patients and methods. For a prospective study, 162 stroke patients (mean age 74 years) were qualified. They were analysed according to neurological state on the 1st day of stroke, the results of transthoracic echocardiography, and functional status at 30 days after stroke.

Results. The neurological state on the 1st day after stroke was significantly worse in patients with LVSD. In patients with reduced EF, functional status was significantly worse at 30 days after stroke. Patients with E/A 0.8–2 had a significantly worse functional status compared to patients with E/A < 0.8. Individuals with E/A 0.8–2 and segmental LVSD or EF < 50% had significantly worse functional status compared to patients without LVSD. An independent factor for moderate/severe status was identified: E/A > 0.8 (RR 3.28 [95% CI 1.15-9.37]); independent factors for poor functional status were lower EF (RR 4.68 [95% CI 1.22–18.00]) and age (RR 4.68 [95% CI 1.22–11.00]).

Conclusions. One quarter of patients in the acute phase of stroke have LVSD and/or LVDD. LVSD adversely affects both neurological status in acute stroke as well as functional status in the short-term follow-up. Age at first-in-life stroke incidence and lower EF are predictors of poor functional status one month after a stroke.

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Keywords

stroke, cardiac dysfunction, fraction ejection, mRankin

About this article
Title

Analysis of echocardiographic parameters of cardiac function in patients with acute stroke

Journal

Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska

Issue

Vol 53, No 2 (2019)

Pages

144-149

Published online

2019-03-11

DOI

10.5603/PJNNS.a2019.0012

Pubmed

30855702

Bibliographic record

Neurol Neurochir Pol 2019;53(2):144-149.

Keywords

stroke
cardiac dysfunction
fraction ejection
mRankin

Authors

Anetta Lasek-Bal
Amadeusz Żak
Piotr Pysz
Przemysław Puz
Zbigniew Gąsior

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