open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2021)
Review article
Published online: 2021-04-19
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A narrative review on the use of lip trainer (Patakara) in oral rehabilitation

Ali Mohamed Ali Ismail1
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2021.0020
·
Medical Research Journal 2021;6(2):153-156.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Physical Therapy for Cardiovascular/Respiratory Disorder and Geriatrics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

open access

Vol 6, No 2 (2021)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2021-04-19

Abstract

The spent time on body exercising is usually given more interest than the exercise of lips, especially after the wide evidence-based demonstrated effects of strong lips on the general health and hence the quality of life. Oral rehabilitation leads to a powerful closure of the lip that can be the first-line defensive mechanism against the many oral dysfunctions as halitosis, snoring, mouth breathing and dryness, and dysfunctions of the oro-gastrointestinal system. The strong lip seal or closure gained from the continuous use of lip muscle trainer (Patakara) not only limits the deteriorated normal physiological oral functions that are associated with the ageing process but also can be considered a good oral rehabilitation device to many oral dysfunctions such as halitosis, snoring, mouth breathing and dryness, and dysfunctions of the oro-gastrointestinal system. Incorporating the use of lip muscle trainer in traditional physiotherapy and rehabilitation programs — especially for geriatrics — is a fundamental part of the whole treatment plan. Physiotherapists must direct their attention toward Patakara utilization in future oral rehabilitation studies to augment and affirm more benefits for this hopeful device. Advising the family relative or caregivers to encourage the elderly to use the lip muscle trainer for maintaining a strong lip is very important.

Abstract

The spent time on body exercising is usually given more interest than the exercise of lips, especially after the wide evidence-based demonstrated effects of strong lips on the general health and hence the quality of life. Oral rehabilitation leads to a powerful closure of the lip that can be the first-line defensive mechanism against the many oral dysfunctions as halitosis, snoring, mouth breathing and dryness, and dysfunctions of the oro-gastrointestinal system. The strong lip seal or closure gained from the continuous use of lip muscle trainer (Patakara) not only limits the deteriorated normal physiological oral functions that are associated with the ageing process but also can be considered a good oral rehabilitation device to many oral dysfunctions such as halitosis, snoring, mouth breathing and dryness, and dysfunctions of the oro-gastrointestinal system. Incorporating the use of lip muscle trainer in traditional physiotherapy and rehabilitation programs — especially for geriatrics — is a fundamental part of the whole treatment plan. Physiotherapists must direct their attention toward Patakara utilization in future oral rehabilitation studies to augment and affirm more benefits for this hopeful device. Advising the family relative or caregivers to encourage the elderly to use the lip muscle trainer for maintaining a strong lip is very important.

Get Citation

Keywords

Patakara, oral rehabilitation, oral health, lip muscle trainer

About this article
Title

A narrative review on the use of lip trainer (Patakara) in oral rehabilitation

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 6, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Review article

Pages

153-156

Published online

2021-04-19

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2021.0020

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2021;6(2):153-156.

Keywords

Patakara
oral rehabilitation
oral health
lip muscle trainer

Authors

Ali Mohamed Ali Ismail

References (33)
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