open access

Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-09-26
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Comparison of two methods of cervical spine pain manual therapy using clinical and biochemical pain markers

Witold Miecznikowski, Paweł Kiczmer, Alicja Prawdzic Seńkowska, Karolina Cygan, Elżbieta Świętochowska
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0034
·
Medical Research Journal 2019;4(3):163-170.

open access

Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-09-26

Abstract

Background. Sedentary lifestyle, often associated with faulty posture is a widespread facilitating factor for
cervical spine dysfunction (CSD).

Objective.
The purpose of our study was to compare two methods of physical therapy for CSD: the
McKenzie method and suboccipital relaxation. We investigated the effect of these methods on pain level
perceived by patients and their physical fitness. The levels of biochemical stress indicators were assessed.

Materials and methods.
Eighty-six adult patients divided into two groups: A and B. Group A included 42
patients treated with the McKenzie method. Group B consisted of 44 patients, who underwent suboccipital
relaxation. The treatment in both groups comprised 3 treatment sessions over a 6-week period. To assess
salivary sIgA concentration, the ELISA technique was used. The alpha-amylase activity was determined
using static method. Pain assessment was performed using the VAS scale. Disability level was evaluated
with the NDI scale.

Results.
Significant decrease of VAS and NDI scores were observed in both groups. An increase of sIgA
concentration was observed in both groups. No difference in amylase activity between the groups was observed,
however, time and group effects the interaction was found to be significant. A significant correlation
between both biochemical markers and VAS score was observed in group B and in the general population.

Conclusions.
Both therapies improve patient outcomes, however, at present we cannot indicate the
advantage any method.

Abstract

Background. Sedentary lifestyle, often associated with faulty posture is a widespread facilitating factor for
cervical spine dysfunction (CSD).

Objective.
The purpose of our study was to compare two methods of physical therapy for CSD: the
McKenzie method and suboccipital relaxation. We investigated the effect of these methods on pain level
perceived by patients and their physical fitness. The levels of biochemical stress indicators were assessed.

Materials and methods.
Eighty-six adult patients divided into two groups: A and B. Group A included 42
patients treated with the McKenzie method. Group B consisted of 44 patients, who underwent suboccipital
relaxation. The treatment in both groups comprised 3 treatment sessions over a 6-week period. To assess
salivary sIgA concentration, the ELISA technique was used. The alpha-amylase activity was determined
using static method. Pain assessment was performed using the VAS scale. Disability level was evaluated
with the NDI scale.

Results.
Significant decrease of VAS and NDI scores were observed in both groups. An increase of sIgA
concentration was observed in both groups. No difference in amylase activity between the groups was observed,
however, time and group effects the interaction was found to be significant. A significant correlation
between both biochemical markers and VAS score was observed in group B and in the general population.

Conclusions.
Both therapies improve patient outcomes, however, at present we cannot indicate the
advantage any method.

Get Citation

Keywords

McKenzie method, suboccipital relaxation, neck pain, amylase, sIgA

About this article
Title

Comparison of two methods of cervical spine pain manual therapy using clinical and biochemical pain markers

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 3 (2019)

Pages

163-170

Published online

2019-09-26

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0034

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2019;4(3):163-170.

Keywords

McKenzie method
suboccipital relaxation
neck pain
amylase
sIgA

Authors

Witold Miecznikowski
Paweł Kiczmer
Alicja Prawdzic Seńkowska
Karolina Cygan
Elżbieta Świętochowska

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