open access

Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-15
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The nature of a nurse’s workplace and their attitude towards learning communicative competence — a representative study of Polish nurses’ population

Lucyna Iwanow, Mariusz Jaworski, Joanna Gotlib, Mariusz Panczyk
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0029
·
Medical Research Journal 2019;4(3):148-156.

open access

Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-15

Abstract

Background: In the education of nurses and midwives, the greatest emphasis is put on practical skills as
the most important element of vocational competences. Education in the sphere of widely understood
interpersonal communication and effective team interdisciplinary cooperation is getting equally important.
It also accounts for important complementation of practical skills.
Exploration of factors influencing the attitude towards learning communicative competence in a group of
nurses undertaking specialization training.
Methods: In the cross-sectional survey study 969 professionally active nurses from various regions of
Poland took part. The respondents were divided into two groups, depending on the specialization training
completed (“anaesthesiological, intensive care medicine and emergency medicine nursing” vs. “geriatrics,
long-term and palliative care nursing”). The voluntary, anonymous survey was conducted with the use of
CSAS questionnaire. A comparative analysis of the results for the two examined groups of nurses was
performed with the use of the t-Student test. The scale of the effect for the observed mean variation was
estimated with the use of d Cohen coefficient.
Results: The examined nurses manifested a positive attitude towards learning communicative competence,
however, a statistically significant difference in the context of the specificity of the ward was observed.
The age of nurses had a negative influence on the analysed variables. Also, a correlation between high
self-esteem of the possessed communicative skills and a high CSAS result was noted.
Conclusions: The nature of the ward, time of hospitalization, as well as age and education of the personnel
influence shaping the attitudes of the nursing personnel in the applicability of communicative competence
in their professional practice.

Abstract

Background: In the education of nurses and midwives, the greatest emphasis is put on practical skills as
the most important element of vocational competences. Education in the sphere of widely understood
interpersonal communication and effective team interdisciplinary cooperation is getting equally important.
It also accounts for important complementation of practical skills.
Exploration of factors influencing the attitude towards learning communicative competence in a group of
nurses undertaking specialization training.
Methods: In the cross-sectional survey study 969 professionally active nurses from various regions of
Poland took part. The respondents were divided into two groups, depending on the specialization training
completed (“anaesthesiological, intensive care medicine and emergency medicine nursing” vs. “geriatrics,
long-term and palliative care nursing”). The voluntary, anonymous survey was conducted with the use of
CSAS questionnaire. A comparative analysis of the results for the two examined groups of nurses was
performed with the use of the t-Student test. The scale of the effect for the observed mean variation was
estimated with the use of d Cohen coefficient.
Results: The examined nurses manifested a positive attitude towards learning communicative competence,
however, a statistically significant difference in the context of the specificity of the ward was observed.
The age of nurses had a negative influence on the analysed variables. Also, a correlation between high
self-esteem of the possessed communicative skills and a high CSAS result was noted.
Conclusions: The nature of the ward, time of hospitalization, as well as age and education of the personnel
influence shaping the attitudes of the nursing personnel in the applicability of communicative competence
in their professional practice.

Get Citation

Keywords

communication skills attitude scale, communication, social skills

About this article
Title

The nature of a nurse’s workplace and their attitude towards learning communicative competence — a representative study of Polish nurses’ population

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 3 (2019)

Pages

148-156

Published online

2019-07-15

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0029

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2019;4(3):148-156.

Keywords

communication skills attitude scale
communication
social skills

Authors

Lucyna Iwanow
Mariusz Jaworski
Joanna Gotlib
Mariusz Panczyk

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