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Expression of PD-L1 in tumor and immune system cells affects the survival of patients with urinary bladder cancer

Mateusz Matusiak, Jakub Dzierżawski, Jakub Jóźwicki, Jarosław Starzyński, Jan Misiak, Anna A. Brożyna, Wojciech Jóźwicki
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0026

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-05-24

Abstract

Background: The prediction of tumor malignancy is still one of the most demanding diagnostic tasks
in urinary bladder cancer because of its clinicopathological heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to
evaluate the expression of PD-L1 in tumor cells (TCs) and immune effector cells (IECs) as well as the
pattern of distribution of PD-L1+ IECs within the tumor (dispersed or aggregated) and their association
with survival of patients with pT1-pT4 urinary bladder cancer.
Materials and methods: 110 patients with stage pT1-pT4 urothelial bladder carcinoma who underwent
radical cystectomy/cystoprostatectomy between 2011 and 2014 were included in the study. Paraffin blocks
most representative of the tumor were selected for H&E staining as well as immunostaining with the use
of rabbit anti-PD-L1 (Ventana clone SP142, Roche). In each sample, the area of the tumor containing PDL1+
IECs, as well as, the pattern of distribution (dispersed or aggregated) of PD-L1+ immune effector
cells within the tumor were analyzed. In addition, the expression of PD-L1 in TCs was also assessed.
Results: Patients had a shorter survival time in pT2-pT4 cases without TCs expressing PD-L1 (p = 0.007)
and/or when PD-L1+ IECs displayed a predominantly dispersed pattern of distribution (p = 0.013).
Conclusions: The expression of PD-L1 on TCs and IECs is a prognostic factor which allows for stratification
of patient survival in UBC. The predominance of dispersed or aggregated pattern of distribution of
PD-L1+ IECs in the tumor may be considered as a new prognostic factor in pT1-T4 UBC and indicate the
functional status of the immune system.

Abstract

Background: The prediction of tumor malignancy is still one of the most demanding diagnostic tasks
in urinary bladder cancer because of its clinicopathological heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to
evaluate the expression of PD-L1 in tumor cells (TCs) and immune effector cells (IECs) as well as the
pattern of distribution of PD-L1+ IECs within the tumor (dispersed or aggregated) and their association
with survival of patients with pT1-pT4 urinary bladder cancer.
Materials and methods: 110 patients with stage pT1-pT4 urothelial bladder carcinoma who underwent
radical cystectomy/cystoprostatectomy between 2011 and 2014 were included in the study. Paraffin blocks
most representative of the tumor were selected for H&E staining as well as immunostaining with the use
of rabbit anti-PD-L1 (Ventana clone SP142, Roche). In each sample, the area of the tumor containing PDL1+
IECs, as well as, the pattern of distribution (dispersed or aggregated) of PD-L1+ immune effector
cells within the tumor were analyzed. In addition, the expression of PD-L1 in TCs was also assessed.
Results: Patients had a shorter survival time in pT2-pT4 cases without TCs expressing PD-L1 (p = 0.007)
and/or when PD-L1+ IECs displayed a predominantly dispersed pattern of distribution (p = 0.013).
Conclusions: The expression of PD-L1 on TCs and IECs is a prognostic factor which allows for stratification
of patient survival in UBC. The predominance of dispersed or aggregated pattern of distribution of
PD-L1+ IECs in the tumor may be considered as a new prognostic factor in pT1-T4 UBC and indicate the
functional status of the immune system.

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Keywords

PD-L1; urothelial bladder cancer; tumor microenvironment; immune cell distribution, immune effector cells, immune checkpoint inhibitors

About this article
Title

Expression of PD-L1 in tumor and immune system cells affects the survival of patients with urinary bladder cancer

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Published online

2019-05-24

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0026

Keywords

PD-L1
urothelial bladder cancer
tumor microenvironment
immune cell distribution
immune effector cells
immune checkpoint inhibitors

Authors

Mateusz Matusiak
Jakub Dzierżawski
Jakub Jóźwicki
Jarosław Starzyński
Jan Misiak
Anna A. Brożyna
Wojciech Jóźwicki

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