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Vol 4, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-16
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Losartan effects on liver cytochromes CYP3A, CYP2C and CYP2E1 functioning at metabolic syndrome in young and adult rats

Larysa Borysivna Bondarenko, Ganna Mykhailivna Shayakhmetova, Alla Kostyantynivna Voronina, Valentina Mykolaivna Kovalenko
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0009
·
Medical Research Journal 2019;4(2):72-79.

open access

Vol 4, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-16

Abstract

CYP450-dependent interactions and toxicological consequences of hypoglycemic and antihypertensive
drugs used in treatment of children with metabolic syndrome (MS) remained unclear. Our aim was to carry
out a complex estimation of metabolic syndrome and losartan mediated changes in CYP3A, CYP2C, CYP2E1
mRNA expression, corresponding marker enzymes activities, liver antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation
parameters of adult and pubertal rats. Wistar albino male rats of two age categories (young animals of 21
days age (50–70 g) and adults (160–180 g) were divided into 6 groups (6 animals in each): 1 – Control 1
(intact young rats); 2 – Control 2 (intact adult rats); 3 –young rats with MS; 4 – adult rats with MS; 5 – young
rats with MS+losartan; 6 – adult rats with MS+ losartan. The metabolic syndrome model was induced
by full replacement of drinking water with 20% fructose solution (200 g/l). After 60 days of MS modeling,
investigation of rat liver CYP3A, CYP2C, CYP2E1 mRNA expression, their marker enzymes activities, lipid
peroxidation parameters were carried out. Losartan administration caused increase of CYP3A, CYP2C
and CYP2E1 mRNA expression rates in both age groups. Marker enzymes, glutathione transferase and
reductase rates were normalized only in adult rats. In group of pubertal animals losartan administration led
to CYP3A and CYP2C marker enzymes activities normalization. Liver reduced glutathione contents remained
decreased in both age groups. Thus, losartan demonstrates some age-dependent effectiveness towards
normalization of CYP450 isoforms expression rates, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, erythromycin-N-demethylase
and diclofenac hydroxylase activities, but not glutathione system and lipid peroxidation rates.

Abstract

CYP450-dependent interactions and toxicological consequences of hypoglycemic and antihypertensive
drugs used in treatment of children with metabolic syndrome (MS) remained unclear. Our aim was to carry
out a complex estimation of metabolic syndrome and losartan mediated changes in CYP3A, CYP2C, CYP2E1
mRNA expression, corresponding marker enzymes activities, liver antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation
parameters of adult and pubertal rats. Wistar albino male rats of two age categories (young animals of 21
days age (50–70 g) and adults (160–180 g) were divided into 6 groups (6 animals in each): 1 – Control 1
(intact young rats); 2 – Control 2 (intact adult rats); 3 –young rats with MS; 4 – adult rats with MS; 5 – young
rats with MS+losartan; 6 – adult rats with MS+ losartan. The metabolic syndrome model was induced
by full replacement of drinking water with 20% fructose solution (200 g/l). After 60 days of MS modeling,
investigation of rat liver CYP3A, CYP2C, CYP2E1 mRNA expression, their marker enzymes activities, lipid
peroxidation parameters were carried out. Losartan administration caused increase of CYP3A, CYP2C
and CYP2E1 mRNA expression rates in both age groups. Marker enzymes, glutathione transferase and
reductase rates were normalized only in adult rats. In group of pubertal animals losartan administration led
to CYP3A and CYP2C marker enzymes activities normalization. Liver reduced glutathione contents remained
decreased in both age groups. Thus, losartan demonstrates some age-dependent effectiveness towards
normalization of CYP450 isoforms expression rates, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, erythromycin-N-demethylase
and diclofenac hydroxylase activities, but not glutathione system and lipid peroxidation rates.

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Keywords

metabolic syndrome, losartan, CYP450, pubertal, rats

About this article
Title

Losartan effects on liver cytochromes CYP3A, CYP2C and CYP2E1 functioning at metabolic syndrome in young and adult rats

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 2 (2019)

Pages

72-79

Published online

2019-02-16

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0009

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2019;4(2):72-79.

Keywords

metabolic syndrome
losartan
CYP450
pubertal
rats

Authors

Larysa Borysivna Bondarenko
Ganna Mykhailivna Shayakhmetova
Alla Kostyantynivna Voronina
Valentina Mykolaivna Kovalenko

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