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Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-16
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TTX-resistant sodium currents in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons depend on extracellular Ca2+ concentration

Kinga Sławińska, Ewa Nurowska, Beata Dworakowska
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0008
·
Medical Research Journal 2019;4(1):35-40.

open access

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-16

Abstract

Background: Previous reports reported the presence of TTX-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 sodium chan­nels in the cortex pyramidal neurons. A characteristic feature of Nav1.9 channels is activation at voltages close to — 70 mV. Therefore, they do not participate directly in the action potential but contribute to the regulation of the resting membrane potential. Their physiological role is modulation of cell excitability. The aim of the study was to investigate, with the use of patch clamp technique, the dependence of the activation thresholds of TTX–resistant sodium currents on the concentration of extracellular calcium in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons in rats.
Results: The recorded values of the threshold of the voltage-dependent sodium currents were in the range of -65 mV to -75 mV. This suggests that the sodium currents may result from the presence of Nav1.9 channels in the rat pyramidal neurons. The threshold for the activation of sodium currents depended on the concentration of Ca2+. Increasing the concentration of calcium ions in the extracellular solution by 5 mM caused the depolarizing shift in the activation potential by about 10 mV. The effect of calcium ion concentration on the potential of TTX-resistant currents activation suggests that Nav1.9 channels are modulated by extracellular Ca2+ concentration.
Conclusions: The study has experimentally confirmed that TTX-resistant channels are present in the cell membrane of the rat prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons and may, therefore, take a physiological role in the conductivity of sodium currents in a manner dependent on the concentration of extracellular ions.

Abstract

Background: Previous reports reported the presence of TTX-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 sodium chan­nels in the cortex pyramidal neurons. A characteristic feature of Nav1.9 channels is activation at voltages close to — 70 mV. Therefore, they do not participate directly in the action potential but contribute to the regulation of the resting membrane potential. Their physiological role is modulation of cell excitability. The aim of the study was to investigate, with the use of patch clamp technique, the dependence of the activation thresholds of TTX–resistant sodium currents on the concentration of extracellular calcium in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons in rats.
Results: The recorded values of the threshold of the voltage-dependent sodium currents were in the range of -65 mV to -75 mV. This suggests that the sodium currents may result from the presence of Nav1.9 channels in the rat pyramidal neurons. The threshold for the activation of sodium currents depended on the concentration of Ca2+. Increasing the concentration of calcium ions in the extracellular solution by 5 mM caused the depolarizing shift in the activation potential by about 10 mV. The effect of calcium ion concentration on the potential of TTX-resistant currents activation suggests that Nav1.9 channels are modulated by extracellular Ca2+ concentration.
Conclusions: The study has experimentally confirmed that TTX-resistant channels are present in the cell membrane of the rat prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons and may, therefore, take a physiological role in the conductivity of sodium currents in a manner dependent on the concentration of extracellular ions.

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Keywords

sodium currents TTX-resistant, Nav1.9 ion channel, pyramidal neurons, patch-clamp

About this article
Title

TTX-resistant sodium currents in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons depend on extracellular Ca2+ concentration

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)

Pages

35-40

Published online

2019-02-16

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0008

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2019;4(1):35-40.

Keywords

sodium currents TTX-resistant
Nav1.9 ion channel
pyramidal neurons
patch-clamp

Authors

Kinga Sławińska
Ewa Nurowska
Beata Dworakowska

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