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Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-01-02
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Recurrent Pneumonia in Children Admitted to Assiut University Children Hospital. Magnitude of the Problem and Possible Risk Factors

Moustafa M. El–Saied, Zienab M. Mohie El Deen, Gamal A. Askar
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0001
·
Medical Research Journal 2019;4(1):13-24.

open access

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-01-02

Abstract

Background: Incidence data indicate that recurrent pneumonia occurs in 7.7–9% of all children with
community acquired pneumonia. We aim by this study to assess the prevalence of recurrent pneumonia
among the admissions with diagnosis of pneumonia in Assiut university children hospital for one year and
to try to define the possible related risk factors. Patients and methods: This is a prospective hospital based
study in Assiut University Children’s Hospital. Children younger than 16 years admitted with a hospital
diagnosis of pneumonia to Assiut University Children’s Hospital for one year from 1 February 2017 to 31
January 2018 were included.
Results: Approximately 1 in 12 children with pneumonia in our locality have recurrent pneumonia with percentage
of 12.61%. Cardiac diseases especially congenital heart diseases was the cause among 25.45%
of the cases, immunodeficiency diseases represented 20.9% of the cases ,while bronchial asthma was
the cause of recurrent pneumonia among 16.36% of the cases. As regard to risk factors in studied group,
prematurity was detected among 7.27 % of the cases while more than 50% were formula fed and more than
60% exposed to pollution. Father smoking was detected among 36.36% of cases. Patients aged > 6 years
showed significantly higher frequency in risk factors as obesity, indoor and outdoor pollution and use of
steroids in comparison to other age groups. However, patients aged 0-3 years exhibited significantly higher
% frequency of having heart disease, oro-motor in coordination /swallowing dysfunction, gastro esophageal
reflux and under nutrition as risk factors for recurrent pneumonia in comparison to other age groups.
Conclusions: The most frequent underlying cause for recurrent pneumonia in Assiut University Children’s
Hospital which presents the largest referral pediatric hospital in Upper Egypt for one year according to our
study was cardiac diseases; the second most frequent cause was immunodeficiency diseases, followed
by bronchial asthma. Risk factors for recurrent pneumonia include socio-economic status of studied
cases, prematurity, exposure to passive smoking and in or outdoor pollution, obesity, under nutrition, lack
of breast feeding, gastro esophageal reflux and steroids usage.

Abstract

Background: Incidence data indicate that recurrent pneumonia occurs in 7.7–9% of all children with
community acquired pneumonia. We aim by this study to assess the prevalence of recurrent pneumonia
among the admissions with diagnosis of pneumonia in Assiut university children hospital for one year and
to try to define the possible related risk factors. Patients and methods: This is a prospective hospital based
study in Assiut University Children’s Hospital. Children younger than 16 years admitted with a hospital
diagnosis of pneumonia to Assiut University Children’s Hospital for one year from 1 February 2017 to 31
January 2018 were included.
Results: Approximately 1 in 12 children with pneumonia in our locality have recurrent pneumonia with percentage
of 12.61%. Cardiac diseases especially congenital heart diseases was the cause among 25.45%
of the cases, immunodeficiency diseases represented 20.9% of the cases ,while bronchial asthma was
the cause of recurrent pneumonia among 16.36% of the cases. As regard to risk factors in studied group,
prematurity was detected among 7.27 % of the cases while more than 50% were formula fed and more than
60% exposed to pollution. Father smoking was detected among 36.36% of cases. Patients aged > 6 years
showed significantly higher frequency in risk factors as obesity, indoor and outdoor pollution and use of
steroids in comparison to other age groups. However, patients aged 0-3 years exhibited significantly higher
% frequency of having heart disease, oro-motor in coordination /swallowing dysfunction, gastro esophageal
reflux and under nutrition as risk factors for recurrent pneumonia in comparison to other age groups.
Conclusions: The most frequent underlying cause for recurrent pneumonia in Assiut University Children’s
Hospital which presents the largest referral pediatric hospital in Upper Egypt for one year according to our
study was cardiac diseases; the second most frequent cause was immunodeficiency diseases, followed
by bronchial asthma. Risk factors for recurrent pneumonia include socio-economic status of studied
cases, prematurity, exposure to passive smoking and in or outdoor pollution, obesity, under nutrition, lack
of breast feeding, gastro esophageal reflux and steroids usage.

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Keywords

Recurrent pneumonia, community acquired pneumonia congenital heart disease, gastro esophageal reflux disease, immunodeficiency diseases, bronchial asthma, socio-economic status, chronic lung diseases, pulmonary tuberculosis , aspiration syndrome

About this article
Title

Recurrent Pneumonia in Children Admitted to Assiut University Children Hospital. Magnitude of the Problem and Possible Risk Factors

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)

Pages

13-24

Published online

2019-01-02

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2019.0001

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2019;4(1):13-24.

Keywords

Recurrent pneumonia
community acquired pneumonia congenital heart disease
gastro esophageal reflux disease
immunodeficiency diseases
bronchial asthma
socio-economic status
chronic lung diseases
pulmonary tuberculosis
aspiration syndrome

Authors

Moustafa M. El–Saied
Zienab M. Mohie El Deen
Gamal A. Askar

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