open access

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-18
Get Citation

Plant stem cells culture — a new tool for skin protection and regeneration

Łukasz Kazmierski, Szymon Roszkowski
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.a2018.0030
·
Medical Research Journal 2019;4(1):52-57.

open access

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-18

Abstract

Development of biotechnology, esthetic medicine and cosmetology can enable us to slow down or delay
the skin aging process. Currently, much attention is aimed at treatments using substances of plant origin.
They have been proven to exhibit antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal properties, accelerate wound
healing, moisturize the skin, enhance skin renewal processes and protect skin against UV radiation. Biologically active plant-derived compounds, however, are often produced by plants in very small amounts.
A solution to this problem is an in vitro culture of callus tissue, representing plant stem cells. Both, in vitro
and in vivo studies demonstrated beneficial effects of plants stem cell extracts on human skin in the battle
against ageing. The aim of this paper was to provide a review of studies based on the use of plant stem
cells in limiting skin ageing.

Abstract

Development of biotechnology, esthetic medicine and cosmetology can enable us to slow down or delay
the skin aging process. Currently, much attention is aimed at treatments using substances of plant origin.
They have been proven to exhibit antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal properties, accelerate wound
healing, moisturize the skin, enhance skin renewal processes and protect skin against UV radiation. Biologically active plant-derived compounds, however, are often produced by plants in very small amounts.
A solution to this problem is an in vitro culture of callus tissue, representing plant stem cells. Both, in vitro
and in vivo studies demonstrated beneficial effects of plants stem cell extracts on human skin in the battle
against ageing. The aim of this paper was to provide a review of studies based on the use of plant stem
cells in limiting skin ageing.

Get Citation

Keywords

phytotherapy; plant-derived compounds; plant stem cells; skin ageing

About this article
Title

Plant stem cells culture — a new tool for skin protection and regeneration

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 4, No 1 (2019)

Pages

52-57

Published online

2018-12-18

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.a2018.0030

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2019;4(1):52-57.

Keywords

phytotherapy
plant-derived compounds
plant stem cells
skin ageing

Authors

Łukasz Kazmierski
Szymon Roszkowski

References (49)
  1. Arda O, Göksügür N, Tüzün Y. Basic histological structure and functions of facial skin. Clin Dermatol. 2014; 32(1): 3–13.
  2. Bordoni B, Zanier E. Skin, fascias, and scars: symptoms and systemic connections. J Multidiscip Healthc. 2013; 7: 11–24.
  3. Kendall AC, Nicolaou A. Bioactive lipid mediators in skin inflammation and immunity. Prog Lipid Res. 2013; 52(1): 141–164.
  4. Uzarska M, Porowińska D, Bajek A, et al. [Epidermal stem cells--biology and potential applications in regenerative medicine]. Postepy Biochem. 2013; 59(2): 219–227.
  5. Puizina-Ivić N. Skin aging. Acta Dermatovenerol Alp Pannonica Adriat. 2008; 17(2): 47–54.
  6. Kohl E, Steinbauer J, Landthaler M, et al. Skin ageing. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2011; 25(8): 873–884.
  7. Zegarska B, Woźniak M. Reasons of endogenous aging of the skin. Gerontologia Polska. 2006; 14: 153–159.
  8. Sveikata K, Balciuniene I, Tutkuviene J. Factors influencing face aging. Literature review. Stomatologija. 2011; 13(4): 113–116.
  9. Schürch C, Blum P, Zülli F. Potential of plant cells in culture for cosmetic application. Phytochemistry Reviews. 2007; 7(3): 599–605.
  10. Guz J, Dziaman T, Szpila A. [Do antioxidant vitamins influence carcinogenesis?]. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online). 2007; 61: 185–198.
  11. Telang PS. Vitamin C in dermatology. Indian Dermatol Online J. 2013; 4(2): 143–146.
  12. Qiao H, Bell J, Juliao S, et al. Ascorbic acid uptake and regulation of type I collagen synthesis in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. J Vasc Res. 2009; 46(1): 15–24.
  13. Baumann L. Skin aging and its treatment. J Pathol. 2007; 211: 241–251.
  14. Sroka Z, Gamian A, Cisowski W. [Low-molecular antioxidant compounds of natural origin]. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online). 2005; 59: 34–41.
  15. Rahmani N, Hashemi SA, Ehteshami S. Vitamin E and its clinical challenges in cosmetic and reconstructive medicine with focus on scars; a review. J Pak Med Assoc. 2013; 63(3): 380–382.
  16. Roman I, Stănilă A, Stănilă S. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of Rosa canina L. biotypes from spontaneous flora of Transylvania. Chem Cent J. 2013; 7(1): 73.
  17. Demir F, Özcan M. Chemical and technological properties of rose (Rosa canina L.) fruits grown wild in Turkey. Journal of Food Engineering. 2001; 47(4): 333–336.
  18. Hancock R, Walker P, Pont S, et al. L-Ascorbic acid accumulation in fruit of Ribes nigrum occurs by in situ biosynthesis via the L-galactose pathway. Functional Plant Biology. 2007; 34(12): 1080.
  19. Graversen H, Becker E, Skibsted L, et al. Antioxidant synergism between fruit juice and α-tocopherol. A comparison between high phenolic black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) and high ascorbic blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum). European Food Research and Technology. 2007; 226(4): 737–743.
  20. Collins AR, Harrington V, Drew J, et al. Nutritional modulation of DNA repair in a human intervention study. Carcinogenesis. 2003; 24(3): 511–515.
  21. Dreher ML, Davenport AJ. Hass avocado composition and potential health effects. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013; 53(7): 738–750.
  22. Bouwstra JA, Dubbelaar FE, Gooris GS, et al. The lipid organisation in the skin barrier. Acta Derm Venereol Suppl (Stockh). 2000; 208: 23–30.
  23. van Smeden J, Janssens M, Gooris GS, et al. The important role of stratum corneum lipids for the cutaneous barrier function. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2014; 1841(3): 295–313.
  24. Horrobin DF. Essential fatty acid metabolism and its modification in atopic eczema. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000; 71(1 Suppl): 367S–72S.
  25. Schagen SK, Zampeli VA, Makrantonaki E, et al. Discovering the link between nutrition and skin aging. Dermatoendocrinol. 2012; 4(3): 298–307.
  26. Mańkowska D, Bylka W. Nigella Sativa L. - Active compounds, biological properties. Herba polonica. 2009; 55: 109–125.
  27. Takenaga F, Matsuyama K, Abe S, et al. Lipid and fatty acid composition of mesocarp and seed of avocado fruits harvested at northern range in Japan. J Oleo Sci. 2008; 57(11): 591–597.
  28. Simon D, Eng PA, Borelli S, et al. Gamma-linolenic acid levels correlate with clinical efficacy of evening primrose oil in patients with atopic dermatitis. Adv Ther. 2014; 31(2): 180–188.
  29. Güçlü-Ustündağ O, Mazza G. Saponins: properties, applications and processing. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2007; 47(3): 231–258.
  30. Kim YG, Sumiyoshi M, Sakanaka M, et al. Effects of ginseng saponins isolated from red ginseng on ultraviolet B-induced skin aging in hairless mice. Eur J Pharmacol. 2009; 602: 148–156.
  31. Hanausek M, Ganesh P, Walaszek Z, et al. Avicins, a family of triterpenoid saponins from Acacia victoriae (Bentham), suppress H-ras mutations and aneuploidy in a murine skin carcinogenesis model. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2001; 98(20): 11551–11556.
  32. Verdier-Sévrain S. Effect of estrogens on skin aging and the potential role of selective estrogen receptor modulators. Climacteric. 2007; 10(4): 289–297.
  33. Stevenson S, Thornton J. Effect of estrogens on skin aging and the potential role of SERMs. Clin Interv Aging. 2007; 2(3): 283–297.
  34. De Orsi D, Pellegrini M, Pichini S, et al. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array and electrospray-mass spectrometry analysis of non-allowed substances in cosmetic products for preventing hair loss and other hormone-dependent skin diseases. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2008; 48(3): 641–648.
  35. Bakoyiannis I, Daskalopoulou A, Pergialiotis V, et al. Phytochemicals and cognitive health: Are flavonoids doing the trick? Biomed Pharmacother. 2019; 109: 1488–1497.
  36. Reuter J, Wölfle U, Korting HC, et al. Which plant for which skin disease? Part 2: Dermatophytes, chronic venous insufficiency, photoprotection, actinic keratoses, vitiligo, hair loss, cosmetic indications. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2010; 8(11): 866–873.
  37. Singh RP, Agarwal R. Cosmeceuticals and silibinin. Clin Dermatol. 2009; 27(5): 479–484.
  38. Trauer S, Patzelt A, Otberg N, et al. Permeation of topically applied caffeine through human skin--a comparison of in vivo and in vitro data. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2009; 68(2): 181–186.
  39. Lu YP, Lou YR, Peng QY, et al. Caffeine decreases phospho-Chk1 (Ser317) and increases mitotic cells with cyclin B1 and caspase 3 in tumors from UVB-treated mice. Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2011; 4(7): 1118–1125.
  40. Mori S, Satou M, Kanazawa S, et al. Body fat mass reduction and up-regulation of uncoupling protein by novel lipolysis-promoting plant extract. Int J Biol Sci. 2009; 5(4): 311–318.
  41. Kubala A. Biological methods of obtaining medical compounds in botany. Gazeta Farmaceutyczna 2013; 26-28. http://polona pl/item. ; 36820267.
  42. Anand S. Various approaches for secondary metabolite production through plant tissue culture. Pharmacia. 2010; 1: 1–7.
  43. Schmid D, Schürch C, Blum P, et al. Plant Stem Cell Extract for Longevity of Skin and Hair. Int J Applied Sci. 2008; 134: 29–35.
  44. Schmid D, Belser E, Zuelli F. Vitalisation of dermal stem cells for skin rejuvenation. Personal Care. ; 2011: 33–35.
  45. Lequeux C, Lhoste A, Rovere MR, et al. Model of in vitro healing to test the influence of dedifferentiated Crithmum maritimum cells on dermal repair and epidermal regeneration. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2011; 24(2): 75–80.
  46. Tito A, Carola A, Bimonte M, et al. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages. Int J Cosmet Sci. 2011; 33(6): 543–552.
  47. Caucanas M, Montastier C, Piérard GE, et al. Dynamics of skin barrier repair following preconditioning by a biotechnology-driven extract from samphire (Crithmum maritimum) stem cells. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2011; 10(4): 288–293.
  48. Schmid D. Stimuli for skin stem cells for real skin rejuvenation. Household and Personal Care. 2009; 1: 26–28.
  49. Montaño I. Dermal stem cells are the target of the latest treatments for deep-seated skin regeneration. Mibelle Biochemistry, Switzerland. ; 2012: 1–6.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.