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Vol 2, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-31
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Angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Jan Filipiak, Joanna Boińska, Danuta Rość
DOI: 10.5603/MRJ.2017.0010
·
Medical Research Journal 2017;2(3):83-88.

open access

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-01-31

Abstract

Angiogenesis is a multistep process controlled by a number of stimulating and inhibiting factors. Aberrant angiogenesis is involved in cancer progression. The best-known elements responsible for regulation of angiogenesis are vascular endothelial growth factor, their membrane-bound receptors, and circulating, soluble receptors. The major objective of the present review is twofold: firstly, it seeks to explore knowledge about angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and secondly it indicates the necessity and relevance of carrying out further research dedicated to this process. Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a proliferative disease of the lymphatic system. The process of angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma has not been studied thoroughly. There is a significant role of paracrine interactions of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells with reactive cells of the immune system, which makes studying the mechanisms of development of Hodgkin’s lymphoma more difficult. It has been proven that several angiogenesis-stimulating proteins are expressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells both in vitro and in tumour tissue. Moreover, some of these proteins are produced by the reactive cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and hepatic growth factor serum concentrations are elevated in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma has not been thoroughly explained. Similarly, there are no satisfying data on the modulation of the angiogenic potential of the blood caused by vascular endothelial growth factor soluble receptors in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Processes controlling angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma merit more comprehensive investigation.

Abstract

Angiogenesis is a multistep process controlled by a number of stimulating and inhibiting factors. Aberrant angiogenesis is involved in cancer progression. The best-known elements responsible for regulation of angiogenesis are vascular endothelial growth factor, their membrane-bound receptors, and circulating, soluble receptors. The major objective of the present review is twofold: firstly, it seeks to explore knowledge about angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and secondly it indicates the necessity and relevance of carrying out further research dedicated to this process. Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a proliferative disease of the lymphatic system. The process of angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma has not been studied thoroughly. There is a significant role of paracrine interactions of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells with reactive cells of the immune system, which makes studying the mechanisms of development of Hodgkin’s lymphoma more difficult. It has been proven that several angiogenesis-stimulating proteins are expressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells both in vitro and in tumour tissue. Moreover, some of these proteins are produced by the reactive cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and hepatic growth factor serum concentrations are elevated in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma has not been thoroughly explained. Similarly, there are no satisfying data on the modulation of the angiogenic potential of the blood caused by vascular endothelial growth factor soluble receptors in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Processes controlling angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma merit more comprehensive investigation.

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Keywords

angiogenesis, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, vascular endothelial growth factor

About this article
Title

Angiogenesis in Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Journal

Medical Research Journal

Issue

Vol 2, No 3 (2017)

Pages

83-88

Published online

2018-01-31

DOI

10.5603/MRJ.2017.0010

Bibliographic record

Medical Research Journal 2017;2(3):83-88.

Keywords

angiogenesis
Hodgkin’s lymphoma
vascular endothelial growth factor

Authors

Jan Filipiak
Joanna Boińska
Danuta Rość

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