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Accelerometer-measured light-intensity physical activity and risk of cardiovascular disease or death in older adults: A meta-analysis

Bo Xie12, Xue Cai3, Yaxin Zhu4, Zilin Sun5, Shanhu Qiu12, Tongzhi Wu6
DOI: 10.33963/KP.a2022.0120
·
Pubmed: 35521714
Affiliations
  1. Department of General Practice, Zhongda Hospital, Institute of Diabetes, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, China
  2. Research and Education Center of General Practice, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, China
  3. Department of Nursing Management, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, China
  4. Department of Endocrinology, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, The 2nd Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, The First Affiliated Hospital of Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
  5. Department of Endocrinology, Zhongda Hospital; Institute of Diabetes, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, China
  6. Adelaide Medical School and Center of Research Excellence (CRE) in Translating Nutritional Science to Good Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

open access

Online first
Original article
Published online: 2022-05-04

Abstract

Background: Light-intensity physical activity (LPA) is related to reduced risk of all-cause death in older adults, but its effect on cardiovascular disease or death remains questioned. This meta-analysis was aimed to quantify the association of LPA with risk of cardiovascular disease and death in older adults.
Methods: We conducted a literature search in electronic databases for prospective cohort studies assessing the relationship between LPA measured by accelerometers and risk of cardiovascular disease and/or death in adults aged ≥60 years. Study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using a random-effects model.
Results: Of the 518 citations identified, 5 prospective cohort studies were included. The mean body mass index of included participants was all over 25 kg/m2. Pooled results showed that the summary HR per 60 min/day higher of LPA was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.98; n = 3) for risk of cardiovascular disease and 0.59 (95% CI, 0.49–0.72; n = 2) for cardiovascular death. Both the relationship of LPA with risk of cardiovascular disease and that with risk of cardiovascular death were linearly- and inversely-shaped. The HR for risk of cardiovascular disease was bigger for LPA than moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), in either equal time or equal amount scale (both Pinteraction < 0.01); but the HR for risk of cardiovascular death was comparable between LPA and MVPA in both scales (both P interaction ≥0.20).
Conclusions: Higher LPA is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and death in older adults.

Abstract

Background: Light-intensity physical activity (LPA) is related to reduced risk of all-cause death in older adults, but its effect on cardiovascular disease or death remains questioned. This meta-analysis was aimed to quantify the association of LPA with risk of cardiovascular disease and death in older adults.
Methods: We conducted a literature search in electronic databases for prospective cohort studies assessing the relationship between LPA measured by accelerometers and risk of cardiovascular disease and/or death in adults aged ≥60 years. Study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using a random-effects model.
Results: Of the 518 citations identified, 5 prospective cohort studies were included. The mean body mass index of included participants was all over 25 kg/m2. Pooled results showed that the summary HR per 60 min/day higher of LPA was 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83–0.98; n = 3) for risk of cardiovascular disease and 0.59 (95% CI, 0.49–0.72; n = 2) for cardiovascular death. Both the relationship of LPA with risk of cardiovascular disease and that with risk of cardiovascular death were linearly- and inversely-shaped. The HR for risk of cardiovascular disease was bigger for LPA than moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), in either equal time or equal amount scale (both Pinteraction < 0.01); but the HR for risk of cardiovascular death was comparable between LPA and MVPA in both scales (both P interaction ≥0.20).
Conclusions: Higher LPA is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and death in older adults.

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Keywords

accelerometer, cardiovascular disease, light-intensity physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, older adults

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Title

Accelerometer-measured light-intensity physical activity and risk of cardiovascular disease or death in older adults: A meta-analysis

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Online first

Article type

Original article

Published online

2022-05-04

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57

Article views/downloads

22

DOI

10.33963/KP.a2022.0120

Pubmed

35521714

Keywords

accelerometer
cardiovascular disease
light-intensity physical activity
moderate-to-vigorous physical activity
older adults

Authors

Bo Xie
Xue Cai
Yaxin Zhu
Zilin Sun
Shanhu Qiu
Tongzhi Wu

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