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Original article
Published online: 2021-10-08
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The burden of cardiovascular risk factors among seniors with congenital heart disease: a single tertiary centre experience

Anna Kwiatek-Wrzosek1, Ewa Kowalik1, Mirosław Kowalski1, Piotr Hoffman1
DOI: 10.33963/KP.a2021.0129
·
Pubmed: 34643259
Affiliations
  1. Department of Congenital Heart Diseases, National Institute of Cardiology, Warszawa, Poland

open access

Online first
Original article
Published online: 2021-10-08

Abstract

Background: The number of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) surviving to old age is increasing worldwide. Acquired cardiovascular comorbidities may complicate the course and treatment of the underlying congenital disease and worsen the prognosis.
Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the burden of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among elderly patients with ACHD.
Methods: A retrospective analysis of data on all patients ≥60 years of age hospitalized in a single tertiary clinic for ACHD between July 2013 and March 2020 was performed. We collected information on smoking status, body mass index, and the presence of dyslipidaemia, systemic hypertension, and diabetes.
Results: The most common CV risk factors among 322 patients ≥60 years of age (median age 66 years; 34% men) were: overweight/obesity (65.5%), dyslipidaemia (64.9%) and arterial hypertension (60.6%). Over 21% of patients suffered from diabetes and 25.8% were smokers. Over 54% of patients had two or 3 CV risk factors. Patients above 70 years of age were healthier in terms of overweight/obesity, dyslipidaemia, and smoking status. Patients with mild ACHD were more likely hypertensive compared to individuals with complex defects. The highest CV burden was noted in younger men with mild ACHD.
Conclusions: We demonstrated a high burden of CV risk factors in seniors with ACHD. Special attention should be paid to identification and control of classical CV risk factors in order to prevent acquired CV disease in this population.

Abstract

Background: The number of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) surviving to old age is increasing worldwide. Acquired cardiovascular comorbidities may complicate the course and treatment of the underlying congenital disease and worsen the prognosis.
Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the burden of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among elderly patients with ACHD.
Methods: A retrospective analysis of data on all patients ≥60 years of age hospitalized in a single tertiary clinic for ACHD between July 2013 and March 2020 was performed. We collected information on smoking status, body mass index, and the presence of dyslipidaemia, systemic hypertension, and diabetes.
Results: The most common CV risk factors among 322 patients ≥60 years of age (median age 66 years; 34% men) were: overweight/obesity (65.5%), dyslipidaemia (64.9%) and arterial hypertension (60.6%). Over 21% of patients suffered from diabetes and 25.8% were smokers. Over 54% of patients had two or 3 CV risk factors. Patients above 70 years of age were healthier in terms of overweight/obesity, dyslipidaemia, and smoking status. Patients with mild ACHD were more likely hypertensive compared to individuals with complex defects. The highest CV burden was noted in younger men with mild ACHD.
Conclusions: We demonstrated a high burden of CV risk factors in seniors with ACHD. Special attention should be paid to identification and control of classical CV risk factors in order to prevent acquired CV disease in this population.

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Keywords

ageing, cardiovascular risk factors, congenital heart disease, seniors

About this article
Title

The burden of cardiovascular risk factors among seniors with congenital heart disease: a single tertiary centre experience

Journal

Kardiologia Polska (Polish Heart Journal)

Issue

Online first

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-10-08

DOI

10.33963/KP.a2021.0129

Pubmed

34643259

Keywords

ageing
cardiovascular risk factors
congenital heart disease
seniors

Authors

Anna Kwiatek-Wrzosek
Ewa Kowalik
Mirosław Kowalski
Piotr Hoffman

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