Vol 72, No 2 (2021)
Review article
Published online: 2021-06-28

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Medical assessment of fitness to dive. Part II

Jarosław Krzyżak1, Krzysztof Korzeniewski23
Pubmed: 34212351
IMH 2021;72(2):115-120.

Abstract

Good physical and mental health is a prerequisite for anyone planning to scuba dive. A certificate of fitness to dive for those willing to enter a scuba diving course as well as for active divers, either amateur or occupational, can only be issued if there are no medical contraindications to dive. It is usually within the competence of a diving instructor, a manager of underwater work or a physician to assess a person’s mental and physical health and grant them permission to stay under hyperbaric conditions. The legal requirements for issuing a certificate of fitness to dive are different for recreational and occupational divers. The part II of this article discusses the issues concerning medical assessment of fitness to dive for professionals, and divers in uniformed services. It also discusses contraindications to scuba diving and guidelines for medical assessment of fitness to dive in divers with a history of a diving-related condition.

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