open access

Vol 69, No 3 (2018)
Review article
Submitted: 2018-09-09
Accepted: 2018-09-19
Published online: 2018-09-27
Get Citation

Chronic symptoms persisting after travel-related infections

Anna Kuna1, Michał Gajewski2
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2018.0033
·
Pubmed: 30270419
·
International Maritime Health 2018;69(3):207-212.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Tropical and Parasitic Diseases, Institute of Maritime and Tropical Medicine, Gdynia, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical University of Gdańsk, Powstania Slyczniowego 9b, 81-519 Gdynia, Poland
  2. Outpatient Clinic of Hepatology, Voivodship Hospital, Szczecin, Poland

open access

Vol 69, No 3 (2018)
TROPICAL MEDICINE Review article
Submitted: 2018-09-09
Accepted: 2018-09-19
Published online: 2018-09-27

Abstract

The authors present the current state of knowledge about the long term sequelae of the common travel-related infections associated with immunological dysregulation. Travellers’ diarrhoea, chikungunya and dengue are common in travellers and protracted manifestations such as post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (travellers’ diarrhoea), arthritis (chikungunya) or post-dengue syndrome may be more prevalent than previously thought. Attention should be paid to active prevention of the infections during travel, especially when an effective treatment against long-term sequelae has not been established. Further studies should be designed in order to determine the interactions between the host, the environment and  the pathogens, as well as to identify the prognostic factors for developing long-term manifestations after infections in a large group of travellers.

Abstract

The authors present the current state of knowledge about the long term sequelae of the common travel-related infections associated with immunological dysregulation. Travellers’ diarrhoea, chikungunya and dengue are common in travellers and protracted manifestations such as post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (travellers’ diarrhoea), arthritis (chikungunya) or post-dengue syndrome may be more prevalent than previously thought. Attention should be paid to active prevention of the infections during travel, especially when an effective treatment against long-term sequelae has not been established. Further studies should be designed in order to determine the interactions between the host, the environment and  the pathogens, as well as to identify the prognostic factors for developing long-term manifestations after infections in a large group of travellers.

Get Citation

Keywords

Travel-Related Illness; Immunology, Communicable Diseases, Imported; Long-Term Complications

About this article
Title

Chronic symptoms persisting after travel-related infections

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 69, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Review article

Pages

207-212

Published online

2018-09-27

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2018.0033

Pubmed

30270419

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2018;69(3):207-212.

Keywords

Travel-Related Illness
Immunology
Communicable Diseases
Imported
Long-Term Complications

Authors

Anna Kuna
Michał Gajewski

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