open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
Original article
Submitted: 2018-08-21
Accepted: 2018-10-23
Published online: 2018-12-19
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Occupational risk perception, stressors and stress of fishermen

Omar Laraqui1, Nadia Manar2, Salwa Laraqui2, Tarik Ghailan3, Frédéric Deschamps1, Chakib El Houssine Laraqui2
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2018.0038
·
Pubmed: 30589062
·
International Maritime Health 2018;69(4):233-242.
Affiliations
  1. University Institute of Occupational Health and Environmental Medicine, Reims, Cedex, France
  2. Graduate School of Health Engineering, Casablanca, Morocco
  3. Moroccan Society of Maritime Health, Tangier, Morocco

open access

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)
MARITIME MEDICINE Original article
Submitted: 2018-08-21
Accepted: 2018-10-23
Published online: 2018-12-19

Abstract

Background: The aim of this survey was to assess the stress in fishermen by analysing its relationship
with sociodemographic and professional characteristics, by evaluating work stressors, and by estimating
psychosomatic symptoms.
Materials and methods: This cross-sectional survey involved representative sample of 828 artisanal and
coastal fishermen. All participants were men and had a regular activity for at least 2 years. We used an
individual questionnaire inspired by those of the National Institute for Research and Security of France
and of the Karasek’s Job Content Questionnaire.
Results: The prevalence of self-reported stress was 53.9%. The average age was 36.7 ± 8.7 years, it was
higher among stressed than non-stressed. The prevalence of stress was higher in subjects with dependents
(69.1%) versus 30.9% without dependents, and among those living alone (61%) versus 47.5% among
those living in couple. The prevalence of harmful habits was 68.5% for tobacco smoking or snuff, 36.8%
for cannabis smoking, 35.4% for alcohol consumption, 8.6% for other psychotropic substances and medications,
and 21.4% for antalgic drugs. These toxic habits were significantly higher in stressed individuals.
Thirty-three point seven per cent had self-reported chronic pathologies (40.5% among stressed vs. 25.7%
non-stressed). Thirty-four per cent were overweight (38.3% among stressed vs. 28.8% non-stressed), and
14% obese (19.3% among stressed vs. 7.6% non-stressed). The average daily working hours were 11.2 h
(12.8 h among stressed subjects vs. 10.5 h non-stressed). Psychological demand was higher in stressed
subjects, while decisional latitude and social support were lower. Psychosomatic symptoms were higher
among stressed than non-stressed. The main suggestions of the fishermen were to improve income, social
welfare, health insurance, safety on board, quality of lifestyle, sport and leisure activities, information and
awareness campaigns of occupational stress, and fight against addictive behaviours.
Conclusions: Fishermen were at a high risk of chronic stress with its health consequences. Health promotion and
education initiatives should be conducted to raise fishermen’s awareness of the dangers of occupational stressors.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this survey was to assess the stress in fishermen by analysing its relationship
with sociodemographic and professional characteristics, by evaluating work stressors, and by estimating
psychosomatic symptoms.
Materials and methods: This cross-sectional survey involved representative sample of 828 artisanal and
coastal fishermen. All participants were men and had a regular activity for at least 2 years. We used an
individual questionnaire inspired by those of the National Institute for Research and Security of France
and of the Karasek’s Job Content Questionnaire.
Results: The prevalence of self-reported stress was 53.9%. The average age was 36.7 ± 8.7 years, it was
higher among stressed than non-stressed. The prevalence of stress was higher in subjects with dependents
(69.1%) versus 30.9% without dependents, and among those living alone (61%) versus 47.5% among
those living in couple. The prevalence of harmful habits was 68.5% for tobacco smoking or snuff, 36.8%
for cannabis smoking, 35.4% for alcohol consumption, 8.6% for other psychotropic substances and medications,
and 21.4% for antalgic drugs. These toxic habits were significantly higher in stressed individuals.
Thirty-three point seven per cent had self-reported chronic pathologies (40.5% among stressed vs. 25.7%
non-stressed). Thirty-four per cent were overweight (38.3% among stressed vs. 28.8% non-stressed), and
14% obese (19.3% among stressed vs. 7.6% non-stressed). The average daily working hours were 11.2 h
(12.8 h among stressed subjects vs. 10.5 h non-stressed). Psychological demand was higher in stressed
subjects, while decisional latitude and social support were lower. Psychosomatic symptoms were higher
among stressed than non-stressed. The main suggestions of the fishermen were to improve income, social
welfare, health insurance, safety on board, quality of lifestyle, sport and leisure activities, information and
awareness campaigns of occupational stress, and fight against addictive behaviours.
Conclusions: Fishermen were at a high risk of chronic stress with its health consequences. Health promotion and
education initiatives should be conducted to raise fishermen’s awareness of the dangers of occupational stressors.

Get Citation

Keywords

fisheries; occupational; stress; health risk

About this article
Title

Occupational risk perception, stressors and stress of fishermen

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 69, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Original article

Pages

233-242

Published online

2018-12-19

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2018.0038

Pubmed

30589062

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2018;69(4):233-242.

Keywords

fisheries
occupational
stress
health risk

Authors

Omar Laraqui
Nadia Manar
Salwa Laraqui
Tarik Ghailan
Frédéric Deschamps
Chakib El Houssine Laraqui

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