open access

Vol 68, No 4 (2017)
Review article
Published online: 2017-12-22
Submitted: 2017-10-08
Accepted: 2017-12-13
Get Citation

Travel medicine for divers

Krzysztof Korzeniewski, Jarosław Krzyżak
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2017.0040
·
Pubmed: 29297573
·
International Maritime Health 2017;68(4):215-228.

open access

Vol 68, No 4 (2017)
TROPICAL MEDICINE Review articles
Published online: 2017-12-22
Submitted: 2017-10-08
Accepted: 2017-12-13

Abstract

Recreational diving is increasing in popularity globally, also among European travellers. Since a majority of popular diving sites are located in tropical or subtropical destinations commonly characterised by harsh climate and poor sanitation, travellers planning to engage in recreational diving are recommended to take certain health prevention measures to reduce travel-associated health risks. They need to be aware of the fact that diving can threaten their lives or even be fatal; however, if they are well prepared physically and mentally and follow all the recommended safety rules while underwater, diving is an unforgettable experience that cannot be compared to any other sports activity performed on land. Before going on a diving trip, it is important to make the necessary arrangements, bearing in mind they should not only concentrate on diving-related activities (the marine environment) but also on other aspects, e.g. contact with terrestrial flora and fauna. Therefore, the health prevention measures (a pre-travel consultation, vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, a properly prepared travel health kit and travel insurance) are to keep a traveller healthy during the entire travel and not just the moments of going underwater. The most important of the pre-travel arrangements include pre-travel medical evaluation, selecting and preparing medications for chronic conditions and assembling the first aid kit for personal use. Travellers are recommended to have a pre-travel consultation in medical facilities whose personnel have an appropriate level of knowledge and expertise on hyperbaric, tropical and travel medicine.

Abstract

Recreational diving is increasing in popularity globally, also among European travellers. Since a majority of popular diving sites are located in tropical or subtropical destinations commonly characterised by harsh climate and poor sanitation, travellers planning to engage in recreational diving are recommended to take certain health prevention measures to reduce travel-associated health risks. They need to be aware of the fact that diving can threaten their lives or even be fatal; however, if they are well prepared physically and mentally and follow all the recommended safety rules while underwater, diving is an unforgettable experience that cannot be compared to any other sports activity performed on land. Before going on a diving trip, it is important to make the necessary arrangements, bearing in mind they should not only concentrate on diving-related activities (the marine environment) but also on other aspects, e.g. contact with terrestrial flora and fauna. Therefore, the health prevention measures (a pre-travel consultation, vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, a properly prepared travel health kit and travel insurance) are to keep a traveller healthy during the entire travel and not just the moments of going underwater. The most important of the pre-travel arrangements include pre-travel medical evaluation, selecting and preparing medications for chronic conditions and assembling the first aid kit for personal use. Travellers are recommended to have a pre-travel consultation in medical facilities whose personnel have an appropriate level of knowledge and expertise on hyperbaric, tropical and travel medicine.
Get Citation

Keywords

divers, travel medicine, prophylaxis

About this article
Title

Travel medicine for divers

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 68, No 4 (2017)

Article type

Review article

Pages

215-228

Published online

2017-12-22

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2017.0040

Pubmed

29297573

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2017;68(4):215-228.

Keywords

divers
travel medicine
prophylaxis

Authors

Krzysztof Korzeniewski
Jarosław Krzyżak

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