open access

Vol 66, No 4 (2015)
TROPICAL MEDICINE Review articles
Published online: 2015-12-22
Submitted: 2015-12-22
Accepted: 2015-12-22
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Travel-related sexually transmitted infections

Krzysztof Korzeniewski, Dariusz Juszczak
DOI: 10.5603/IMH.2015.0045
·
Pubmed: 26726895
·
International Maritime Health 2015;66(4):238-246.

open access

Vol 66, No 4 (2015)
TROPICAL MEDICINE Review articles
Published online: 2015-12-22
Submitted: 2015-12-22
Accepted: 2015-12-22

Abstract

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are among the most common notifiable health problems worldwide, with particularly high rates in developing countries. Men and women with multiple sexual partners at home or a previous history of STIs are more likely to have casual sexual exposure (CSE) while travelling. Over the last several decades 5% to even 50% of short-term travellers engaged in CSE during foreign trips. It is estimated that only 50% of travellers use condoms during casual sex abroad. Sexual contact with commercial sex workers is an exceptionally high-risk behaviour. The common risk factor is also young age. Adolescents and young adults constitute 25% of the sexually active population, but represent almost 50% of all new acquired STIs. Many STIs are asymptomatic and therefore can be difficult to identify and control. The clinical manifestation of STIs can be grouped into a number of syndromes, such as genital ulcer or erosion, urethral or vaginal discharge, pelvic inflammatory disease. STIs are divided into curable infections caused by bacteria (gonorrhoea, chlamydiasis, syphilis, chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale) or protozoa (trichomoniasis) and incurable viral infections (genital herpes, genital warts, HIV). STIs are not only a cause of acute morbidity, but may result in complications including male and female infertility, ectopic pregnancy, cervical cancer, premature mortality or miscarriage. Monogamous sex with a stable, uninfected partner or sexual abstinence remains the only way to avoid the risk of becoming infected with STIs.  

Abstract

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are among the most common notifiable health problems worldwide, with particularly high rates in developing countries. Men and women with multiple sexual partners at home or a previous history of STIs are more likely to have casual sexual exposure (CSE) while travelling. Over the last several decades 5% to even 50% of short-term travellers engaged in CSE during foreign trips. It is estimated that only 50% of travellers use condoms during casual sex abroad. Sexual contact with commercial sex workers is an exceptionally high-risk behaviour. The common risk factor is also young age. Adolescents and young adults constitute 25% of the sexually active population, but represent almost 50% of all new acquired STIs. Many STIs are asymptomatic and therefore can be difficult to identify and control. The clinical manifestation of STIs can be grouped into a number of syndromes, such as genital ulcer or erosion, urethral or vaginal discharge, pelvic inflammatory disease. STIs are divided into curable infections caused by bacteria (gonorrhoea, chlamydiasis, syphilis, chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale) or protozoa (trichomoniasis) and incurable viral infections (genital herpes, genital warts, HIV). STIs are not only a cause of acute morbidity, but may result in complications including male and female infertility, ectopic pregnancy, cervical cancer, premature mortality or miscarriage. Monogamous sex with a stable, uninfected partner or sexual abstinence remains the only way to avoid the risk of becoming infected with STIs.  

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Keywords

sexually transmitted infections, travellers, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, prevention

About this article
Title

Travel-related sexually transmitted infections

Journal

International Maritime Health

Issue

Vol 66, No 4 (2015)

Pages

238-246

Published online

2015-12-22

DOI

10.5603/IMH.2015.0045

Pubmed

26726895

Bibliographic record

International Maritime Health 2015;66(4):238-246.

Keywords

sexually transmitted infections
travellers
epidemiology
clinical symptoms
prevention

Authors

Krzysztof Korzeniewski
Dariusz Juszczak

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