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Vol 7, No 2 (2016)
Review paper
Published online: 2016-11-09
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Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease assessed by flow cytometry in acute myeloid leukemia

Edyta Ponikowska-Szyba, Jolanta Woźniak, Joanna Góra-Tybor
DOI: 10.5603/Hem.2016.0010
·
Hematologia 2016;7(2):97-107.

open access

Vol 7, No 2 (2016)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-11-09

Abstract

Despite high complete remission rate after induction chemotherapy, long-term prognosis for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients is still unsatisfactory. Leukemic blast cells remaining after therapy, which cannot be detected by standard method for response assessment in AML, termed minimal residual disease (MRD) are responsible for frequent relapses. High sensitivity methods, e.g. flow cytometry are being widely studied for MRD monitoring. Majority of studies confirm this parameter to be an independent risk factor for relapse and death in AML. What is more, MRD assessment is thought to be complementary to cytogenetic and molecular aberrancies in risk stratification and applying more adequate risk-adapted therapy. However, lack of method standardization is an obstacle to its incorporation into clinical practice.

Abstract

Despite high complete remission rate after induction chemotherapy, long-term prognosis for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients is still unsatisfactory. Leukemic blast cells remaining after therapy, which cannot be detected by standard method for response assessment in AML, termed minimal residual disease (MRD) are responsible for frequent relapses. High sensitivity methods, e.g. flow cytometry are being widely studied for MRD monitoring. Majority of studies confirm this parameter to be an independent risk factor for relapse and death in AML. What is more, MRD assessment is thought to be complementary to cytogenetic and molecular aberrancies in risk stratification and applying more adequate risk-adapted therapy. However, lack of method standardization is an obstacle to its incorporation into clinical practice.

Get Citation

Keywords

acute myeloid leukemia, minimal residual disease, multiparameter flow cytometry

About this article
Title

Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease assessed by flow cytometry in acute myeloid leukemia

Journal

Hematology in Clinical Practice

Issue

Vol 7, No 2 (2016)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

97-107

Published online

2016-11-09

DOI

10.5603/Hem.2016.0010

Bibliographic record

Hematologia 2016;7(2):97-107.

Keywords

acute myeloid leukemia
minimal residual disease
multiparameter flow cytometry

Authors

Edyta Ponikowska-Szyba
Jolanta Woźniak
Joanna Góra-Tybor

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