open access

Vol 94, No 11 (2023)
Research paper
Published online: 2023-03-15
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Is the expression of placental epithelial and lymphoid markers associated with the perinatal outcomes in preeclampsia?

Zeynep Bayramoğlu1, Sibel Özler2
·
Pubmed: 36929800
·
Ginekol Pol 2023;94(11):929-938.
Affiliations
  1. Department od Pathology Konya Education and Research Hospital, Konya, Türkiye
  2. Department of Perinatology, KTO Karatay University, Konya, Türkiye

open access

Vol 94, No 11 (2023)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2023-03-15

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the association of the epithelial and lymphoid immune markers with the adverse perinatal conditions such as early-onset preeclampsia (EOPE), fetal growth restriction (FGR) and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) in preeclampsia in the placentae of preeclamptic patients.

Material and methods: A total of 60 pregnant patients were included in this study. The immunohistochemistry method was used to determine the expression levels of CD4, CD8, CD4 / CD8, CD68, P53, MDM2, CK18, CK19, E-cadherin, and β catenin.

Results: In our study, the increase in E-cadherin expression in the preeclamptic fetal-maternal placental region was associated with EOPE and FGR development preeclampsia and the decrease in the expression of CD4 and CD8, which are involved in the local immunomodulation, was associated with IUFD.

Conclusions: Our data reveal that the increase in the expression of CK18, CK19, E-cadherin, and β-catenin and the decrease in CD4 and CD8 play a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the association of the epithelial and lymphoid immune markers with the adverse perinatal conditions such as early-onset preeclampsia (EOPE), fetal growth restriction (FGR) and intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) in preeclampsia in the placentae of preeclamptic patients.

Material and methods: A total of 60 pregnant patients were included in this study. The immunohistochemistry method was used to determine the expression levels of CD4, CD8, CD4 / CD8, CD68, P53, MDM2, CK18, CK19, E-cadherin, and β catenin.

Results: In our study, the increase in E-cadherin expression in the preeclamptic fetal-maternal placental region was associated with EOPE and FGR development preeclampsia and the decrease in the expression of CD4 and CD8, which are involved in the local immunomodulation, was associated with IUFD.

Conclusions: Our data reveal that the increase in the expression of CK18, CK19, E-cadherin, and β-catenin and the decrease in CD4 and CD8 play a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

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Keywords

E-cadherin; CD4; CD8; β-catenin; early onset preeclampsia; adverse perinatal outcomes

About this article
Title

Is the expression of placental epithelial and lymphoid markers associated with the perinatal outcomes in preeclampsia?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 94, No 11 (2023)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

929-938

Published online

2023-03-15

Page views

302

Article views/downloads

264

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2023.0027

Pubmed

36929800

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2023;94(11):929-938.

Keywords

E-cadherin
CD4
CD8
β-catenin
early onset preeclampsia
adverse perinatal outcomes

Authors

Zeynep Bayramoğlu
Sibel Özler

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