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Vol 93, No 12 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-12-30
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The role of visceral therapy, Kegel’s muscle, core stability and diet in pelvic support disorders and urinary incontinence — including sexological aspects and the role of physiotherapy and osteopathy

Malgorzata Wojcik1, Grazyna Jarzabek-Bielecka23, Piotr Merks4, Katarzyna Plagens-Rotman2, Magdalena Pisarska-Krawczyk5, Witold Kedzia3, Malgorzata Mizgier6, Maciej Wilczak7
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2022.0136
·
Pubmed: 36602196
·
Ginekol Pol 2022;93(12):1018-1027.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Physical Culture in Gorzow Wielkopolski, Poznan University of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland
  2. Center for Sexology and Pediatric, Adolescent Gynecology, Division of Gynecology, Department of Gynecology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  3. Division of Gynecology, Department of Gynecology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  4. Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Collegium Medicum, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw, Poland
  5. Nursing Department, President Stanisław Wojciechowski State University of Kalisz, Kalisz, Poland
  6. Department of Sports Dietetics, Dietetic Division, Faculty of Health Sciences, Poznan University of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland
  7. Department of Mother's and Child's Health University of Medical Sciences in Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 93, No 12 (2022)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2022-12-30

Abstract

Proper diet and physical activity are a form of prevention of female genital prolapse disorders. The causal substrate of pelvic floor dysfunction is multifactorial. Fifty percent of women over the age of 50 have pelvic organ prolapse, often accompanied by urinary incontinence. It is a complicated social and medical (urogynecological and sexological) problem. The authors conducted a literature review on the role of visceral therapy, Kegel and core stability exercises and diet in pelvic support disorders and urinary incontinence. The eligible articles provided insights into sexological factors, as well as the role of osteopathy and physiotherapy. These results provide new insights into the relevance of clinical practice. In addition to standard treatment methods used in gynaecology, sexology, physiotherapy and osteopathy (e.g., visceral therapy), Kegel muscle and core stability exercises are becoming increasingly important. The aim of visceral therapy is to restore the mobility of the organs while reducing increased tension and improving blood and lymph circulation. This has the effect of reducing pain sensations, thereby influencing the function of the uterus and ovaries.

Abstract

Proper diet and physical activity are a form of prevention of female genital prolapse disorders. The causal substrate of pelvic floor dysfunction is multifactorial. Fifty percent of women over the age of 50 have pelvic organ prolapse, often accompanied by urinary incontinence. It is a complicated social and medical (urogynecological and sexological) problem. The authors conducted a literature review on the role of visceral therapy, Kegel and core stability exercises and diet in pelvic support disorders and urinary incontinence. The eligible articles provided insights into sexological factors, as well as the role of osteopathy and physiotherapy. These results provide new insights into the relevance of clinical practice. In addition to standard treatment methods used in gynaecology, sexology, physiotherapy and osteopathy (e.g., visceral therapy), Kegel muscle and core stability exercises are becoming increasingly important. The aim of visceral therapy is to restore the mobility of the organs while reducing increased tension and improving blood and lymph circulation. This has the effect of reducing pain sensations, thereby influencing the function of the uterus and ovaries.

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Keywords

physiotherapy; osteopathy; visceral therapy; exercise; menopause; pelvic organ prolapse; urinary incontinence

About this article
Title

The role of visceral therapy, Kegel’s muscle, core stability and diet in pelvic support disorders and urinary incontinence — including sexological aspects and the role of physiotherapy and osteopathy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 93, No 12 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

1018-1027

Published online

2022-12-30

Page views

540

Article views/downloads

201

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2022.0136

Pubmed

36602196

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2022;93(12):1018-1027.

Keywords

physiotherapy
osteopathy
visceral therapy
exercise
menopause
pelvic organ prolapse
urinary incontinence

Authors

Malgorzata Wojcik
Grazyna Jarzabek-Bielecka
Piotr Merks
Katarzyna Plagens-Rotman
Magdalena Pisarska-Krawczyk
Witold Kedzia
Malgorzata Mizgier
Maciej Wilczak

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